Do snow tires any good for Icy roads.

I would like to get snow tires, but just wondering if their only good for snow or are they also good for icy roads too.

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If you get GOOD snow tires they are good for both. Bridgestone Blizzak and Dunlop Graspic are two that come to mind that are pretty good on both ice and snow. I have Graspics on both vehicles and the daughter's Neon
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wrote:

Whe I lived in cold country, we used to have the steel studs put in snow tires and that definitely makes them better on ice. I think I had some siped or little cuts made across the tread but this isn't as good as studs.
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"Scott" <homealone.com> wrote in message wrote:

good
Studded tires are illegal in the heavy snow states like Minnesota and Michigan.
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Rich wrote:

Province of Ontario too. Makes a lot of sense, doesn't it?
Rob
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I know they are illegal in Michigan and Indiana. Many years ago (1970's) we could.
wrote:

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In IN they are legal from Oct to May. The reason that they are illegal is that on clear pavement they can do damage to the roads. Mark "Tim or Linda snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net>" <lt<dot> wrote in message wrote:

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unless I'm mistaken that is for steel studded tires. Walnut shell studded tires should still be legal. If it's legal ice performance that you're looking for.
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wrote:

Blizzak
daughter's
They are not considered a studded tire but they are supposed to give better traction.
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wrote:

The walnet shells are compunded into the rubber. On some tires its silica instead. They are "studless" ice tires.They are legal everywhere. Never seen a walnut shell stud.
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i had studded tires in idaho, as far as i know they where legal, I think I remember there being a law about having them off by march or something. oh and those tires worked great
wrote:

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wrote:

I installed studs on thousands of tires between 1968 and 1971. Then Ontario banned them, and I pulled studs on close to a thousand tires in 1972.
By the way, the studs were not steel - they were tungsten carbide.
There are hard plastic studs available now, and apparently they WILL be legal next year in northern Ontario.

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The best all around tire for winter is a WINTER tire. Not snow tires, which are designed for deep snow. Winter tires have a less aggressive tread pattern than snows and are constructed with a top layer of rubber, about 5/16 deep that is formulated to stay sort in cold weather, laid over ordinary rubber to the wear indicators. Unlike ordinary all season tires, winter tires do not get hard at temperatures below 20 degrees. Like a motorcycle tire the rubber is soft, for added traction, but wears off in around 10,000 miles. The layer below extends the life of the tire when summer arrives. Blizzaks are one brand that comes to mind. They are however for from the best brand one can buy and there are several. Vriedistiens, made in Holland. are much better. They cost around the same price, but nome of them are cheap. Winter tires are best when used on all four wheels but the can be installed on just the drive wheels on RWD cars. RWD cars are not nearly as likely to loose steering control, during deceleration, as FWD cars
mike hunt
lbbss wrote:

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I think alot depends on your local weather. We get lots of ice but also snow. The closer tread and siping on winter all season is better than deep lugs on ice, but deep lugs are much better in snow and mud. I'm wearing Hankook M&S tires right now and they seem great so far. They clean mud damn good and snow tractions been good and ice has been good.
GOD BLESS THE USA Member of IPCO- International Pest Control Operators Public message board- http://www.ipconetwork.org/fmb/cboard.mv
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 14:55:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

In some jurisdictions, like PA, you MUST install winter tires, or snow tires on ALL FOUR wheels, regardless whether fwd or rwd, and on certain roads you MUST have winter tires or chains.

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Really? Where are those? Here in Colorado we often have Chain or adequate snow tire restrictions but usually for only short periods of time. I don't know of any that require them all winter although there are some rural roads where it might be recommended or even necessary.
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I know back in the seventies there were roads in Idaho that were posted - chains or 4wd required past this point from Nov to March. or something to that effect.
PA law, at least last time I checked, PROHIBITTED installing only 2 snow tires on a 4 wheeled vehicle. When my parents went to visit friends in the Cumberland? area 20 years ago or so, they were warned they needed snow tires to travel into that area and must carry chains (bear gap? - can't remember for sure) and having out of state plates would be OK with snows on the rear only - but may get hassled by the local constabulary. They went with snows and carried chains.
Laws are "selectively enforced" so in many cases you may not be charged for running without legally required equipment - untill you are involved in an accident. Then the "county mounty" can pull out the rule book and find some obscure law nobody has heard about for 10 years to nail you.
I know in SOME areas, the "snow tires" MUST have the new designation and crest with the mountain and snow-flake to classify as winter tires. Anything else is considered an all-season and not allowed.
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There is no law in Pa requiring snow tire on two wheels, let alone all four on state roads. Local jurisdictions can post signs requiring the use of snow tires and/or chains on LOCAL streets, when there is a snow emergency declared. The courts have determined that the driver can be find, but only if they block emergency equipment with a vehicle not so equipped, doing that emergency.
mike hunt
snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

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lbbss wrote:

Well snow is snow and ice is ice.I would consider investing in some cable type tire chains. Otherwise wait for the salt trucks to do their thing..... Don't be like the idiot who just HAD to go out in the middle of a hurricane, to get a pack of smokes?????
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