Dogged by squealing brakes...

I had brake pads and brake discs fitted a couple of years ago, Halfords parts - Foolish I know.
The brakes squealed from start to finish, nothing unusual with them
according to the mechanic and a former mechanic family friend of mine.
Just had a new set fitted, with an Auto Parts brand of Discs and Pads - It's even bloody worse!
Please can anyone advise how I can rid this embarrassing annoying high pitched squeal for the duration of the life of the brakes?
Thanks.
PS Copper grease was applied to the back of the pads in both cases of fitting, which apparently reduces the risk of the issue.
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in article snipped-for-privacy@q18g2000vbn.googlegroups.com, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com at snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote on 4/2/09 8:50 AM:

suppose to be an anti-rattle clip in the disks ... replace new is my IMO on the refit. Also have anti-squal good that is spread on the rear of some pads systems provided in the kit of course. have you tried autolight Ford brakes ... some after markert pads are harder, duster and are less forgiving to rotor warping.
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On Thu, 2 Apr 2009 08:50:52 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

You don't say what vehicle but, some are much worse than others about squeaking brakes. The squeel is nothing more than an audible vibration of the pad. The squeak is usually stopped or minimized by interferring with the path of the vibration to the calipre. I have no idea why a copper lube on the back of the pad would reduce or interfer with this. I have had few problems with brake squeak by using the shims included with most new pads. In addition, I use a de-squeak material on the back of the outboard pad only. It goes on as a liquid and should be allowed to set 10-15 minutes before installation of the pads. This material tends to provide a bit of a bond between the pads and the calipre which increases the mass of the assembly which, in turn, modifies the frequency toward an inaudible range. I also use a file and slightly champher the edga of both pads t a slight angle to prevent the sharp edge of the pad from contacting the rotor. Many new pads are champhered out of the box. The breakin period for the pads should involve varying application force and normal use until they are fully seated or burnished. Use the copper based lube on the calipre sliders - not the pads. It is also possible that your hearing is overly sensitive in those frequency ranges. My wife is one of those with greatly extended hearing range and gets finicky (CRANKY!!) about brake squeal.
Lugnut
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Many disc brake pad sets will come with "break in instructions"... but let's consider the whole process.
Cleanliness is next to Godliness... the face of the linings should be free of dirt, oil, grease, fingerprints, smegma or any other detritus... I scuff the faces of the linings together and also use the linings like an emerty board to "break" any sharp edges...
Observing the break in procedure... usually, this will consist of several moderate to firm brake applications to help cure the linings... avoid stopping during these manoevers if possible (obviously, selecting a reasonable test route is of the essence).

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