F150 vs. F250

Considering the pros and cons of a 4x4 F150(5.4L) vs an F250 diesel.
I don't need a truck as heavy as a 250, or a diesel, just wondering if there are any added maintenance steps with a diesel engine, or anything
I should stay away from, I'm considering vehicles in the area of 2000, and the prices are actually quite comparable for similar options & mileage (even with one being diesel).
I need a truck to haul my toys around, and do my firewood, and lugging materials to the camp (50/50 highway/offroad approx)
Any tips, should I stay away from a diesel or go with it? reliability better or worse? Maintenance on an f250 more or less than an f150?
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I can only recommend going with the diesel if you really need the extra pulling power....
Oil change interval is the same as the gas engine... only you buy 14 litres of oil instead of six... and a $20 filter instead of a $8 filter....
Shops that have the tools and the knowledge to repair the PSD can be difficult to find and the repairs themselves can be quite spendy. Idling and light load driving can be hard on them as this will leave the combustion chambers quite cool.... wet stacking and cylinder washing can become real concerns under these conditions.
Run as intended, they are a wise choice... buying a diesel for the sake of having a "rattler" can prove to be frustrating..

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Jim Warman wrote:

Well that probably sums it up. Its quite rare anyway that a diesel here can be found at a comparable cost to a gasoline. I really do like the looks of the ~2000 F250 over the F150, but I don't get THAT hung up on looks. The towing power in the gasoline is good enough for me (and is comparable to my old 351 95 f150).
Now the only question comes down to the 4.6 vs the 5.4. I know the 4.6's are very reliable, as we run in to the ground about 10 of them a year at work all with in excess of 350k kms on them all hard woods driving. I'm sure the 5.4 is just as reliable.
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Well, you also have to look forward a few years - the F150 with a gasoline engine may be enough for what you tow now, but you might want to go a bit bigger. And if you have to sell one truck and buy another, there are expenses.
Diesel has it's advantages - if you drive with a light foot most of the time you can get some mileage numbers that put gas engines to shame. And it has the grunt to pull a house off the foundation.
Gas engines 150K to 250K miles between bottom-end overhauls, Diesels can do 300K to 500K in the same duty and with proper maintenance.

There is no substitute for cubic inches. Yes, I know, the saying was written before metrification. But it's still true, unless you want to go nuts with forced induction you don't want to go small.
--<< Bruce >>--
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I'm not sure what you are basing some of your statements on.... A car with a small displacement diesel can pull some pretty inpressive numbers.... but the engine is sized so that driving the car normally can and will maintain adequate combustion chamber temps to eliminate any chances of wet stacking.
As a Ford certified diesel technician, I regularly see customers with misconceptions about light truck diesels.
Run and maintained as intended, a diesel can see many more miles than it's gasoline counterpart..... but the big part of the equation is cost per mile..... Purchasing a diesel (in a 7000 pound truck) thinking that fuel economy is going to be it's saviour, isn't a really wise decision.
I would buy a diesel truck in a heartbeat.... except that there are 50 weeks in the year where most of my operating conditions will deliver unreasonably high "cost per mile" conditions.... not to mention oil dilution and other concerns related to low combustion temperatures. For the other two weeks of the year, I continue to lust for the added pulling power of the PSD....
Considering that I work on these for a living, have access to all the factory tools and I am at no ones mercy when it comes to repairing them.... one would think that I would own one of these. Truth be known.... the decision to switch to diesel power should be made carefully. Get past the advertising hype and the macho trappingsand learn to deal with the issues that really matter....
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Diesel engines last a lot longer than gasoline engines, you can make your own fuel for them from cooking oil. Besides, when you buy bigger toys, you'll need the power of the diesel.
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Just don't forget to send in the federal and your states road use fuel taxes. ;)
mike
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Rule number one don't buy less truck than you need. Rule number TWO don't buy MORE truck than you need.
mike

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Mike Hunter wrote:

Well a RANGER doesn't cut it ;) I have a car that outdoes my ranger.
Naw, theres a lot more selection in the used f150 market than f250 anyway...
when did htey stop putting the 5spd in the 4.6?
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I didn't like the tires on the F150

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