Ford Aerostar battery not charging

1994 Aerostar 3.0l V6 battery not charging. The battery dies while driving and the car dies. I had the alternator checked and it "failed" at Murrays. I bought a brand new alternator (not a
re-man) and had it tested before I left and had the battery recharged as well. The battery is one year old and Murrays said it was fine.
I installed the new alternator and the battery indicator (has an "8" on the left side and an "18" on the right) keeps moving to the left and eventually the battery died just as before. Any suggestions?
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"bozomedic" wrote: > 1994 Aerostar 3.0l V6 battery not charging. The battery dies > while driving and the car dies. I had the alternator checked > and it "failed" at Murray's. I bought a brand new alternator > (not a re-man) and had it tested before I left and had the > battery recharged as well. The battery is one year old and > Murrays said it was fine. > > I installed the new alternator and the battery indicator (has > an "8" on the left side and an "18" on the right) keeps moving > to the left and eventually the battery died just as before. > Any suggestions?
Ok....went back to murrays and they replaced the battery. The alternator seems to work becuase I can detach the positive cable from the battery and the car still runs. The battery indicator is more towards the "18" side than the "8" side.
When I put all things on in car, i.e. blower, defroster and radio, the car runs fine. As soon as I turn the lights on, the battery indicator jumps to the left and appears to cut out the alternator. What can this be?
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It's likely a poor connection or fuselink near the distribution point.. around the starter relay.. should be getting hot when that happens
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Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
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bozomedic wrote:

The battery indicator (voltmeter) is telling you that there's a massive discharge when turning on the lights. It's a wonder the circuit breaker doesn't pop & turn off the current to the lights. It sounds as if there's a power distribution problem on the wring coming thru the firewall FROM the battery. Look/smell for burnt wiring around the firewall.
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Running the engine with the battery removed is a great way to damage the electrical system and cost you a bundle. You got away with it this one time so you probably won't take my advice. Remember this when you are at the parts store.
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Just in case you dont get that meaning.... the adverts in the back of Popular Mechanics, back in the sixties and seventies, had several gadgets that promoted little boxes that allowed you to run household drills from your car's alternator... worked by switching out the voltage regulator.
Just takes a couple milliseconds to ruin your week. And your week's paycheck.
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FWIW, this should be noted by anyone who reads this thread. As a side note, maybe car manufacturers should start adding a section in the Owners Manual, or even a warning label under the hood by the battery, stating that the battery should absolutely NOT be disconnected while the car is running.
Not to pick on just one person but, why do people believe that while the car is running, disconnecting one of the battery terminals is an effective way to test their charging system? I don't know how many times I've heard backyard mechanics (no offense Backyard Mechanic) and even sometimes "certified mechanics" tell people that this is a good way to test your charging system. BULLSHIT!! This is a good way to toast the computer, and many times other parts of the electrical system. If you think you had problems with your car beforehand and you try this trick and fry your $500 computer, or worse, you'll really be in trouble.
At some point, and I'm suprised it hasn't happened yet, someone is going to post a topic stating that they were diagnosing a charging problem and decided to pull off one of the battery terminals with the car running. Then, if they happen to have a horseshoe up their ass, they'll continue on about how they miraculously made it out of the garage when the car caught on fire, after the positive terminal decided to weld itself onto the negative terminal because it was moving about with the car running. This, or something worse, is bound to happen if people continue to make fools of themselves because they don't know what they are doing. Something to ponder for a minute, if the power went out in your house, would you climb the telephone pole on a ladder and start fiddling with the power lines in an attempt to restore power to your home? No I don't think so.
Point being, when it comes to doing mechanical work on cars, use some common sense. And if you don't know what you are doing, take it to someone who does.
Just my 2 cents, Sharky
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