Ford Minivans

I was told that the newer models of the ford minivan uses it's headlights at all times, but to get the tail lights to come on you have to use a different switch. So my question for all is was I given correct
information?
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saberns wrote:

A lot of vehicles do that; they use the headlamps operating at full or reduced power as Daytime Running Lamps (DRLs), and yes the tail lights usually don't come on with the DRLs.
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"Sharon K.Cooke" wrote

And since DRL systems usually use the high beams at half-brightness, you're semi-blinding people in front of you, yet totally black (invisible) from the rear.
Doesn't anyone read the owner's manual any more? I'm sure it says you still have to turn on the headlight switch at night, but there's thousands of cars driving around with only half their lights on. I want a sign for my back window that lights up and says "Please turn on ALL your lights!".
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Though many confuse 'autolamps' with DRLs, there is no connection. I agree that one should spend ten seconds learning the difference before taking a new vehicle on the road. Alas, few of us read manuals. Perhaps the software industry, which shoves a new version down our throats every couple months and does not even provide printed manuals anymore, is to blame. Of course, there is not much damage one can do by driving a home computer without reading the manual...
Many countries, including Canada, require DRLs. One would expect that these laws were enacted after some thought and are not the result of ignorance. I believe that DRL's don't operate tail lights to avoid confusing them with brake lights. As for semi-blinding oncoming traffic, at least in Fords, the intensity is much less than half brightness. In DRL mode the high beams are operated at 25% power, which probably translates to around 10% brightness (at low power the filament is much less efficient). I frequently drive in tunnels and can't even see my DRLs reflecting in the car ahead of me. I suspect that those drivers who are blinding you simply turn their high beams on by mistake - it's often hard to see the high beam indicator in daylight.
And by the way, I don't wish this experience on anyone, but after an encounter on a mountain road with a distracted driver who veered into the opposite lane, I became a believer in DRLs.

you're
the rear.

still
cars
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It will be hard to drive off at night with DRLs, thinking that these are your regular lights, because your dashboard will be dark. Also, Ford's DRLs don't turn on until you release the parking brake. Don't know if GM vehicles follow the same logic.

...
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happy snipped-for-privacy@abc.net (Happy Traveler) wrote in <ZISdnSQ6zeqo2
<snip>

Surely you know that there are many stupid laws on the books. The fact that something was mandated by The Government doesn't necessarily mean that it was intelligently considered -- or for that matter, done with the average citizen's best interest in mind. Especially in Canada. ;-) (Consider, for example, the mandatory center high-mounted brake light, which history has now proven does *not* live up to its purpose of reducing rear-end collisions.)

I, for one, find DRLs to be blinding on a sunny day, especially with a fresh coat of snow on the ground. The amber ones I've seen on a few cars aren't *too* bad, but there are times that I want to take a slingshot to some of the clear/white ones.
<snip>

I work for a 9-1-1 center, and I can assure you that people pull out in front of cars with all their lights on at night (when cars with their lights on are easiest to see) all the time. IMO, having DRLs on motorcycles is not a bad idea, considering the bike's tiny silhouette, but they are at best a nuisance on cars. -- Jim
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Motorcycles currently use headlamps at all times. DRLs have been debated to death in the NGs. There is no doubt DRLs can be an added safety item in some conditions. As with the case with seat belts, there are situation were they can do more harm than good. Test and practical experience has proven that belt use prevents more injuries and death than they produce The question is do the advantages of DRLs exceed the numerous problems THEY present. I would suggest to anybody interested, on both sides of the debate, that they do a search of the US Congressional Record for the reason DRLs were NOT made mandatory in the US. Once you have the facts on both sides of the argument you will be able to decide for yourself which opinion is the most valid. Personally none of my vehicles are equipped with DRLs. When I drive under conditions where I believe my vehicle needs to be more visible, like driving with the sun to my back, I engage my headlamps for maximum visibility.
mike hunt

DRLs.
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