ford oil pressure

I have a difficult problem with a ford 460 in a rv converted shuttle bus. After running dry on oil(dont know why that happened) the oil pressure is 0 i confirmed that it really has no op. the engine is not
locked up and starts but with no op i dont dare run it. if the oil pump
is really dead its a real bear to get it out of the engine in this vehicle. this sounds real rube goldberg but is it possible to pump oil into another place in the engine like where the oil pressure sending unit is and have it circulate to the critical places? i cant find any place that shows the oil circulation path in the engine. I could get an
electric pump hook the suction side to the oil pan drain and the discharge to some other place in the engine?
if anyone knows where i can find a drawing showing the oil circulation path in this engine please post it. thanks
mike
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I love this kind of thinking Mike because it feels so good when you can create something that works, saves money, and beats the established norm for service. What you propose might be done. You would need to plum suction and return from the oil pan. Pressure to the mains might not be adequate. We'll see what others say on this. But really, it would cost more and do more damage than it's worth. Since you ran the engine dry of oil in the first place and don't know why, you need to start there. Maybe the engine had no pressure because the main bearings were worn, although those oil pumps do go bad. They don't make the engine go dry thourgh. I think you should concentrate on the easiest way to remove the pan so you can check the engine out and get lucky replacing the pump.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The crankshaft is hollow, and the internal oil pump sends oil thru the crankshaft center to holes in the crankshaft, all located at junctions of the crank/connecting rods. Indicated oil pressure is a reading of the back pressure on the oil pump caused by the oil being forced thru the holes with the connecting rod bearings covering them. Oil pressure can vary, based on condition of oil pump, oil filter, pickup screen (dirty/clean), connecting rod bearing or crankshaft journal wear, engine rpm, or oil viscosity; as the oil heats, the viscosity drops. See reference below. In any event, it sounds as if what you have is a "spun bearing", allowing the oil to pass the crank/bearing interface with virtually zero resistance. If you want to save the engine, it's time to drop the pan. http://www.carolinahealeys.com/Technical%20Pages/Engine/oil%20pressure%20diagnostics.htm
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wrote:

http://www.carolinahealeys.com/Technical%20Pages/Engine/oil%20pressure%20diagnostics.htm
A spun bearing is likely; may even be the front cam bearing that feeds oil to the galley that the oil pressure is read from.
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On 2 Mar 2006 21:49:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

any wetspots? check in rad is there oil? how are you checking pressure?

start with oil pump remove distributor....tun pump by hand

you may have slop you may have an inop pump bypass valve my be focked in pump

you have a puter you have google do your own work

foctard h u r c
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