Ford's CEO speaks on Marketplace

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Marketplace, an American Public Radio show will interview the CEO of Ford this evening. He talks about Ford's plan for its own economic recovery.
You can find your station and time here:
http://marketplace.publicradio.org//about/stations /
Jeff
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Stopping the mass production of lemons might be a good place to start. No advanced degree from Haaarvaaaaad needed to come up with that business plan.
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snipped-for-privacy@mailpanda.com wrote:

Fortunately, Ford has learned that lesson well. I haven't heard any reports of about problems with the Fords that are now in production. No doubt there will be the occasional bad car. That happens to all the car makers.
Jeff
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Oh really? So how long have you been employed by Ford?
Ford's Lemons Leave Sour Taste in Consumers' Mouths Company's Turnaround Effort Omits a Key Constituency
By Joe Benton ConsumerAffairs.Com
December 4, 2006
* Spark Plug Spitters * F-150 Engine Fires * Police Car, Taxi Fires * Focus Ignition Lock-Ups * Windstar Head Gaskets No one can say Ford doesn't get lots of publicity. Unfortunately, most of it is bad. The company expects to lose $10 billion this year and is trying to borrow $15 billion in operating cash as its "Way Forward" turns into a desperate dash for the exits.
Wall Street may still be wondering about Ford's future, but two important constituent groups have already made up their mind -- customers and employees are running the other way.
Ford had a 10 percent drop in sales in November compared to a year earlier, slipping behind Toyota for the second time this year.
Perhaps most ominously, employees are fleeing like miners whose canary has died. A mind-boggling 38 percent of Ford's hourly workers have agreed to take buyouts, hoping to get out before the company caves in on them.
Newspapers and TV tend to treat it as a business story, quoting financial analysts, politicians, union leaders and the usual collection of talking heads. Almost no one listens to consumers -- the lifeblood of the American economy. This is a major oversight, as no company that spurns, ignores or mistreats its customers will long survive, no matter how many friends it has on Wall Street or Capitol Hill.
At ConsumerAffairs.Com, we hear from Ford owners every day ... and they are not happy. Their Ford cars and trucks are still spitting spark plugs, catching fire and locking up the ignition. In response, Ford stonewalls, federal safety regulators dawdle and dealers -- well, the dealers, as always, do whatever they can get by with. Consumers Revolt
While Ford diddles with its finances and holds erudite discussions about its manufacturing processes, it is alienating huge segments of its customer base with shoddy products and an astonishingly cavalier response to consumer complaints. In the last 12 months, we have received four times more complaints about Ford products than about GM or DaimlerChrysler.
No only are Ford complaints more frequent than complaints about other brands, the problems that spark the complaints are major -- ruined engines, disastrous fires and repeated ignition lock-ups being the most common.
* Buy American? Not Again * Ford's Spit-Out Spark Plugs Hit Mechanics in their Wallets * Spit Spark Plug Ignites Ford Truck * Ford Mechanic: Engines "Dropping Like Flies" * 2003 Ford Trucks Now Spitting Spark Plugs * Ford Trucks Spit Spark Plugs * Petition Asks Feds to Order Ford Recall * Consumers Complain of Spark Plug Blow-Out
--
* More about Ford ...
Thousands of Ford owners have suffered the ordeal of a spark plug
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@mailpanda.com wrote:

I never worked for Ford.

Gee, that is over a year ago. That just a few months after Mulally took charge.
A more recent view is here: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/business/22ford.html
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Why would anyone spend 1 minute of their life listening to a corporate CEO? They are part and parcel of the elitist ruling class who have exploited, and now, destroyed the working middle class of America. Lying is an integral part of their job description as is being greedy beyond all comprehension. A more loathsome and detestable breed is not to be found. Throughout the years I've had the misfortune of being in the same room with some of these characters. Without exception I felt slimed by their presence within 10 minutes and wanted to leave so I could take a shower. A sensation shared by most others in the room as well.
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snipped-for-privacy@mailpanda.com wrote:

Obviously, the people of America buying stuff made overseas had nothing to do with that.

It seems you have some anger issues. Unfortunately, while I agree that most CEOs are overpaid, a company needs a good CEO to run it. Obviously, you are not up to the task. Neither am I. Mulally did a good job at Boeing, like setting up the assembly line that built the 777 that landed at Heathrow airport, just before the runway.
Jeff
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...Moving operations to China...
(tongue in cheek...err I hope so anyway)
Pah
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pahtoot wrote:

Actually, Ford, GM and Chrysler are all trying to increase their market presence in developing countries. Chrysler just made a deal with Nissan to sell Nissans in South America. Ford and GM are building plants (often in partnerships with other companies) in Asia to to sell cars in China and India.
They are more interested in adding operations than moving operations.
Jeff
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They all say that in the beginning until the foreign plants are well established...than bye bye unionized NA workers.
Thanks for the info on Ford's foreign developments. It will be the last time I buy Ford based on the North American loyalty argument. Instead I'm going to follow others, best value for dollar.
Pah
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pahtoot wrote:

Well, the plants they are building in Asia are for cars designed for the Asian market. They are too small for the North American market and may not meet our safety and emmissions standards.
If the American market demands smaller cars than we can efficiently build in the US, would you rather the Michigan 3 have expertise in building small cars? They way, they can import the expertise rather than have Honda and Toyota and Cherry import the cars themselves.

You missed the part about how the cars they make in Asia are for the Asian market.
Next time you buy a Dell or HP computer, check on where the parts are made. Hint: not the US.

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Bad analogy since no car maker has parts that are not made in other parts of the world either. Both HP and Dell still do the main R&D (bulk of budgets), Engineering, and final assembly in North America.
The parts engineered, designed, manufactured, and assembled (if required) in Asia are in many cases the same parts that get shipped to the North American factory. I'd be surprised if Ford made any non-body parts in NA anymore. The bodies are still done here, but my concern from your reply was 'for how much longer'.
Pah.
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pahtoot wrote:

IIRC, the content of most of the Michigan-3 cars is something like 70-80% Canadian + US. So the vast majority of the content is from North America. Whether Ford makes them or another company makes them in North America, I don't know or care.
Jeff
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I was just looking at a Fusion, the 4 cyl is made in Mexico, transmission, Japan assembled in Mexico
is that part of North America?
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happyD wrote:

>

The Fusion is not Ford's only car sold in the US.
However Mexico is part of North America. Japan isn't.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_america
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Jeff I've been asking several mechanics and all have said that most engine parts in Ford cars (especially economy class) are designed and manufactured outside of USA/Canada.
Although Mexico is considered NA, the manufacturers go there for the same reasons they go to China, to avoid paying decent wages. cheap labor means inferior product in many cases because what slave gives two hoots about end product? I don't support these types of moves on principle alone, and yes I've heard all the arguments that some wage is better than no wage, blah blah blah. Plus the savings are not being passed back to North American consumers.
2 mechanics said many Mazda parts fit Fords. Really odd is that some Mazda truck parts fit in the Ford Mustang for instance.
Pah
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pahtoot wrote:

The Ford Focus is manufactured in Wayne, MI. The engine is made in Mexico.

Yet the wages Ford pays are higher than the prevailing wages.

Except that if Ford doesn't get more savings, there won't be any Ford to compete.

Ford controls Mazda. A lot of Fords have Mazda parts. The Ford Excape and the Mazda Tribute are the same vehicle. Ditto Ranger and Mazda truck.
I hate to tell you this, but lots of parts in your computer are made overseas by low-wage people.
Your choice is to buy car from a company that makes most of the parts in the US, Canada or Mexico (Ford, GM or Chrysler) or to buy a car from a company that makes mote content of their cars over seas (just about anyone else).
Jeff

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Non-sense. Unionized Ford workers get a heck of a lot more per/hr than Mexican Ford workers do.

Nonsense. They wouldn't move if they didn't make more from it.
.

As mentioned before when you brought this up, this is a bad analogy. There isn't any computer company that doesn't get its parts from overseas, and it has been that way since longer than I can remember. Certainly a lot longer than Ford quietly switching development of major parts to overseas. You keep saying that Ford makes the majority of parts in NA, only it doesn't. The bodies are 'assembled' in USA/Canada, but nothing else. I fear from your original post that it will not be that much longer before the USA/Canada plants become warehousing only.
Pah
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pahtoot wrote:

Yet it was not always that way. Intel still makes chips in the US.

Really? The engines in the Focus are made in Mexico. The stickers say the majority of the parts are made in the US or Canada.
For the F-150, Escape, and Expedition, the engine and transmission are made in the US and assembly is in the US.
In Fords, about 75-80% of the content is from the US/Canada. And more is from other parts of North America.

Why? Toyota and Honda are opening plants here.

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It would be more factual to say Mazdas have a lot of FORD parts. The Trubute and the Mazda "B" series pickups, are rebaged Excapes and Rangers, albiet the Mazdas are higher priced, that are built on Ford assembly lines. Mazda does not have anywere near the build capasity or economies of scale to make aparts for Fords, nor would it be practical to ship them to the US, to use in Fords.
There are so few Mazdas sold in the US that is was no longer cost effective to assemble them in the Flat Rock plant alonside the FWD Probe. That plant was switched to RWD in 2004 to build the 2005 Mustang. Mustangs carry the "Z" designation, rather than the "F"
Ford and Mazda engineers work together on new products, that may first appear on the much lower volume Mazdas, but when used on Fords they use Ford parts because of economies of scale.
The Commerace Depatment list the Ford F150 as having the highest domestic content at nearly 90% with the Siverado second at 85%
wrote in >> 2 mechanics said many Mazda

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