Ford Tempo Brakes: Can't Remove Caliper Pens

I am trying to fix the brakes on my Ford Tempo (earlier thread) and am at the point of trying to remove those 2 screws that hold the caliper on.
Excuse my language, but good God DAMN!!!
They apparently are 3/8" allen-wrenches, and I have an allen-wrench--but try try try as I may, that damn screw WILL NOT MOVE! It won't budge an inch.
What kind of tool do I need to remove this thing? It's on so tight, I don't think even a freaking CRANE could get this thing off.
What tool would work, and also if I may--why do these freaks think they have to put something on so dag-deemed tight? Who do they think is working on these cars, Godzilla?
LRH
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You need heat to soften the Loctite.
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First, you cant do it with a standard allen wrench. The application calls for an allen SOCKET. The L shaped allen everyone has bends and limits the torque applied.
Second, give the head a couple good sharp blows with a hammer. Not on side, on the top. That will loosen the bond enough to get it started with a healthy grunt.

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Thanks for the replies. What was needed was a T-47 "star socket," I think 3/8 is the right size.
The Chilton Manual I was borrowing said I needed "Tork Park Number xxx-xxx-xxxxxx-xxxxxx" or something like that. I'm like--wouldn't T-47 Star Socket make the point?
The other thing, too--pardon me for sounding like the rank weekend warrior I admit to being, but why in the world can't they decide ONE single type of screw--be it bolt, single-slot screw, philips-head screw, allen, star-socket--whatever--and have every single last thing in the world be assembled with that one type and absolutely NOTHING else at all? Why all the types? It clearly isn't necessary.
Sure, the different SIZES are; after all, you're talking about applications that could range from eyeglasses to bridges, obviously you're going to have a huge running of the gamut with sizes, makes sense. But with all these different TYPES, I'm thinking--standardize already. For crying out loud, you have to own like $1000 worth of tools to work on anything, and that is just ridiculous.
On the other hand, my computer basically only needs 2-philips head screwdrivers in TOTAL for everything. I can use my Philips head screwdriver and ratchet set and work on 99 1/2% of everything around my house--including all the furniture & any appliances. Why do cars have to have such a HUGE running of the gamut? It just makes no sense to me.
Frankly, their ought to be a law mandating that car makers can use only ONE type, total, for everything right down to the sun visors and the engine bolts. You are allowed to use EITHER a bolt, an allen, a star socket, a slotted screw, or a Phililps head screw for every last thing--size-variations obviously would be allowed (no way the same screw that holds up the sun visor could be the same one that holds the engine in place), but as for types--it would be forbidden BY LAW to have ANY and I mean ANY variations in "type" of screws. No variations allowed, none, whatsoever. Period. That way, a car owner could simply own the various sizes of ONE TYPE and fix every last thing on his/her car.
LRH
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Then they should outlaw phillips... would you like that?
;)
I was about to make the same comment.."why would they use allen on a tempo? Ford only uses torx or hex bolt."
But I figgered you could see if it were a star shape or not.
cheers
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It is called 'Torx', and it has assembly-line advantages in speed and reliability, which is why it's used. It's the same idea as 'Posidrive', which looks like phillips-head, but has 4 extra tiny notches, and is at a different angle. Both are designed so that when assembling something, they can be screwed down quickly and reliably, without the driver popping out and gouging what you are assembling, or even hurting someone.
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Thanks for the clarifications. I suppose if it saves assembly-line time and thus keeps the price of the car down (to say nothing of the importance of preventing on-the-job injuries), I suppose I could see it. But then, if that's the case, why not use the Torx on everything--from eyeglasses to bridges, if it's so good?
Just keep us weekend-warriors from having to spend so much money on tools (to say nothing of the clutter of keeping up with so many); after all, we're doing this ourselves to save money to begin with.
LRH
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Each has advantages and disadvantages. Posidrive can be used on screws with flush or near-flush heads. Torx requires some head thickness. Torx can handle more torque during install. Regular old hex bolts can handle even more.
In the RV industry and screws commonly used for home decks, square- head (Robertson) screws are very common.
http://doityourself.com/tools/typesofscrewdrivers.htm
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"" wrote: > Thanks for the replies. What was needed was a T-47 "star > socket," I think > 3/8 is the right size. > > The Chilton Manual I was borrowing said I needed "Tork Park > Number > xxx-xxx-xxxxxx-xxxxxx" or something like that. I'm > like--wouldn't T-47 Star > Socket make the point? > > The other thing, too--pardon me for sounding like the rank > weekend warrior I > admit to being, but why in the world can't they decide ONE > single type of > screw--be it bolt, single-slot screw, philips-head screw, > allen, > star-socket--whatever--and have every single last thing in the > world be > assembled with that one type and absolutely NOTHING else at > all? Why all the > types? It clearly isn't necessary. > > Sure, the different SIZES are; after all, you're talking about > applications > that could range from eyeglasses to bridges, obviously you're > going to have > a huge running of the gamut with sizes, makes sense. But with > all these > different TYPES, I'm thinking--standardize already. For crying > out loud, you > have to own like $1000 worth of tools to work on anything, and > that is just > ridiculous. > > On the other hand, my computer basically only needs 2-philips > head > screwdrivers in TOTAL for everything. I can use my Philips > head screwdriver > and ratchet set and work on 99 1/2% of everything around my > house--including > all the furniture & any appliances. Why do cars have to have > such a HUGE > running of the gamut? It just makes no sense to me. > > Frankly, their ought to be a law mandating that car makers can > use only ONE > type, total, for everything right down to the sun visors and > the engine > bolts. You are allowed to use EITHER a bolt, an allen, a star > socket, a > slotted screw, or a Phililps head screw for every last > thing--size-variations obviously would be allowed (no way the > same screw > that holds up the sun visor could be the same one that holds > the engine in > place), but as for types--it would be forbidden BY LAW to have > ANY and I > mean ANY variations in "type" of screws. No variations > allowed, none, > whatsoever. Period. That way, a car owner could simply own the > various sizes > of ONE TYPE and fix every last thing on his/her car. > > LRH
Larry R Harrison Jr, I feel your pain. We have standard sizes (thoe they vary from standard to metric). in some cases it may even make sense to have different patterns (dont want flathead in high torque, and cant have star in eyeglass size). With cars what usually happens is they get the seatbelts from company A and the Door hinges from company B. besides, all the people at craftsman would lose there job if all i had to buy was an allen wrench set. what I hate more is when you have to buy a custom tool to work on the 2005 model, when the 2004 model could be done with something standard, and its the exact same setup!!!!
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