Ford to Police: get lost!

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http://www.detnews.com/2003/autosinsider/0307/19/autos-221387.htm
BOB

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I was LMAO at the City of Dallas when I heard on the local news about a week ago that Ford basically said to take your business elsewhere if they don't like the Crown Victoria. The representative for Dallas was whining about how the CV is the only choice left since the Caprice is gone and that Officers will be forced to drive "older model Crown Victorias" and pointed to a 1997 model. Well hell, I drive a 1992 Geo Metro with 245k miles on it - I'd love a 1997 Ford Crown Victoria! Maybe cities will start taking better care of the cars and rebuilding them instead of spending so damned much money on new cars every year.

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I am trying to figure out what is so funny. It is the standard business model. If you do not like the CV, you buy a different car. My brother is part of the management at Ford, and he likes the Impala police package, as it gives them something to compete against that is not particularily well received by the policing community, but still keeps them honest.
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Both Chevrolet and Dodge offer a certified police vehicle to compete with the CV. They are only V6 powered but can be had for about $2,000 less.. Few departments use them except for city service and detective work. The major reasons are FWD is unsafe for highway patrol or pursuit work, very small back seats that do not allow room for the cage, higher maintenance costs, lower resale value that soon negates any original cost savings. Taxi companies gobble up used police CV's, but have very little use of the others.
mike hunt
Richard Bell wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

IIRC, Chrysler does NOT currently produce a factory police-package car. The last one they did produce was (drumroll) a K-code Jeep Cherokee.
Some police agencies do use Intrepids for cruisers, but they are NOT true factory police package cars like the K-code Polara, Monaco, Fury, Gran Fury, and Diplomat of years gone by.
Not sure about GM- their "9C1" package used to be the equivalent of Chrysler's K-code packages, and they might offer it on the current Impala.
But for real all-duty police work, its the Ford PI or nothing at the moment.
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Yes they do, started for the 2003 model year.

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Richard Bell wrote:

Exactly. I'll admit that I would like to see the CV be a little bit safer, and rubber bladder on the tank (or redesign future models to reposition the tank) would be nice. But if a police agency CONTINUES to buy a car that they claim is *unsafe*, then that pretty much invalidates their claim. In fact, if they were truly serious, then the agencies involved in this lawsuit would pull ALL of their current stock of Interceptors out of service and either go back to old Caprices, or buy Impalas. Continuing to use a product you claim is unsafe and a threat to life and limb totally flies in the face of common sense.
The "no choice" argument is BS. If they're so worried about safety and truly believe that the CV is the death trap they claim it is, then the CV should not BE a choice.
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Even the normally aspirated I-6 is quite good, with 182 KW power ,and 380Nm torque, that is 244 HP and 280 pound feet torque in American speak... And for those who must have a V8, a 5.4L 3V per cylinder V8 is available with a whopping 260 KW power and 500 Nm torque. and again that is 348 HP and 369 pound feet of Torque. All that in a 4 door sedan with RWD just slightly smaller than a CV, and just slightly larger that a Taurus, and built solid as a rock.. But of course, FORD does not respect the North American Consumer enough to give us such a car. Instead we get trucks....and Retro BS..
V.B. Mercon wrote:

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wrote:
|Despite all the complaints, and rightly so, which other car does the police |have to choose that is suitable for Highway Patrol. GM, Chrysler and Dodge |abandoned the full size rear drive platform, in favor of the FWD platform.
2004 Dodge Hemi Charger. 4 doors, RWD, 300+ HP
Watch for the Police Pursuit Package
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The "Dodge Hemi Charger" is not here as yet, it is still a way off, so how are they going to choose it..??? Despite all the CV complaints, it has proven itself many times over. However, as I have said, there is still room for improvement. As the only full-size RWD American car "Presently" available, Ford has a captured market. They should not take that market for granted.

police
Dodge
platform.
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mentioned...

Speaking of Hemis.. Does anyone remember 'way back in the late '50s and early '60s when Mopar V-8s had the holes in the valve covers, and you had to use a 6" extension on your ratchet to remove the spark plugs? Yeah, those were the days..
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"Hemi"... Normally a prefix understood to mean "half".
But being bandied about today like it's "*THE* *ONE* *HOLY* *TRUTH*".
Over the years, I've also heard it applied to quite a few cars that could be considered "big, bad, and beefy"...
But just what the hell does it mean when somebody says a vehicle is/has a "hemi"???
Googling did me no good - If the answer is there, it's buried in too many hits to things that (without spending who-knows-how-long chasing a ridiculous number of links) appear to have no relationship to my question.
So, can anyone give me, in understandable terms, a useful definition of just exactly *WHAT* a "hemi" is when the term is applied to a vehicle? Somebody *PLEASE* tell me it doesn't mean the vehicle has "half" an engine :)
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Don Bruder wrote:

My belief was always that a "Hemi" referred to a Chrysler Engine with a domed chamber on the head and a domed piston.
Dome, nown: A vaulted roof having a circular, polygonal, or elliptical base and a generally hemispherical or semispherical shape.
Frank
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Hmmm... OK, I *THINK* I can buy that as reasonable. It at least kinda makes sense, although the reason for the geometry doesn't leap right out and bite me.
I can't help but wonder what, if any, benefit there would be to having the fuel/air charge mashed into the shape it would be with the setup you describe versus a more "normal" flat head/piston combination. All other things being equal, it would seem that one would have no real advantage over the other, since the compression would be either the same, or close enough to it that I can't see an obvious difference. The charge wouldn't be any larger, since the geometry of head and piston match, so what's the big deal?
Now if the piston crown were FLAT, and the head domed, I could see it being a larger charge in the cylinder, but that would lower the compression by a corresponding amount. Wouldn't it?
Assuming yours is the "right" answer, anybody want to try to tell me why a "hemi" is more desirable than a... ummm... conventional? ...engine?
Especially with the recent wave of commercials from (I think...) Dodge, that take great pains to make you aware that the truck is/has a hemi.
And while we're at it, is it more proper to say "That truck/car/whatever *IS* a hemi", or "That truck/car/whatever *HAS* a hemi"? Seems I've heard both phrasings used over the years, which has surely contributed to my lack of understanding. Or maybe I'm just dumber than a box of rocks, and it's something so screamingly obvious that I should be ashamed to even need to ask?
(Yeah, yeah, I know... I'm hopeless... If I were *REALLY* a "gearhead", I'd already know. My apologies for spending the last 30-odd years not much caring what a vehicle has under the hood, who makes it, what fancy gadgets it has, or what it looks like, so long as it reliably gets me where I want to go faster than walking would.)
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Don Bruder wrote:

Well, a Hemi head allows you to run more valve area than a typical wedge head. It also is slightly more resistant to detonation which allows a slightly higher compression ratio for a given octane rating. Both of these are Good Things(tm)

yes. the piston crown is not flat, it's actually shaped to fit the "dome" in the head.

More Power Argh Argh Argh ARGH!

Well, see, the term "Hemi" while referring to a shape of combustion chamber that anyone can use (and honestly, most high-performance engines probably do, or some variation thereof) has a special place in the hearts of MoPar fans since both the original Hemi (of which the 392 was the version to have) or the later 426 Wedge-based Hemi (a.k.a. "the elephant" due to its width) consistently kicked, and continue to kick to this day, the collective asses of just about every other engine available. (ever watch drag racing? The Hemi is *still* the engine to beat, nevermind that it hasn't been officially made in 30 years.) I think Dodge is just trying to cash in on the name recognition, although maybe I'm just being cynical and the new Hemi will turn out to be just as dynastic an engine as the old ones.

IMHO the term "Hemi" refers to the engine not the vehicle, although it's acceptable to refer to, say, a Hemi Charger (i.e. a Dodge Charger factory equipped with a 426 Hemi engine)

I'm trying to imagine life like that... IMHO you need serious professional help. Let us know where you're located and surely some regular will be able to suggest a course of treatment.
nate

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<snip good explanation>
Great! That tells me all I needed to know. Gracias, mi amigo!

Don't waste yer effort on poor pathetic little me. I'm the screwball who thinks "horsepower per person" in a vehicle should equal *ONE*, top speed should be about 14MPH, the engine is SUPPOSED to fart and attract flies, runs on hay and/or oats, "coolant leaks" are no big deal, and "filling the tank" means nosing up to the water trough so the "engine" can take a drink. Never mind that "Emissions testing" involves a spoon, a magnifying glass, and the ability to recognize worm eggs... :)
Seen on the back of an Amish Buggy while travelling through Beaverton (one of Michigan's Amish enclaves): "1 Horsepower - Caution! Don't step in the exhaust!"
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"Don Bruder" wrote

Blatantly copied from http://www.rockcrawler.com/reviews/dodge/2003_Ram_2500HD_Hemi/index.asp
The theory behind the motor (and any motor) was that the easier an engine breathes, the greater its volumetric efficiency and the more power it produces. The hemispherical combustion chamber design allows large valves to be located across from each other instead of side-by-side, which creates cross flow and free flow between the intake and exhaust ports. What that means is a more complete burning of the air/fuel mixture coming from a central spark plug, located close-by. The design also minimized heat loss, which in turn, means more energy. The name "hemispherical" comes from the fact that the smallest amount of space that can contain a given volume is a sphere. A hemispherical combustion minimized the surface area, thus minimized heat loss.
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I just Googled Chrysler Hemi and the first thing that came up was a description of the hemi history so you can't have tried very hard.
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The troll got some bites.
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The "holes" are back! http://www.dodge.com/ram_hd/capability/hemi_history / On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 22:37:22 -0700, Watson A.Name - 'Watt Sun'

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