Fuel Tank Capacity: 1988 Crown Victoria?

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Anyone know what the fuel tank capacity is for a 1988 Crown Victoria?
Thank you.

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Station Wagon was 65 litres (~17.17 US Gallons)
On Sat, 8 Jan 2005 05:15:03 +0000 (UTC), Jonathan Grobe
~Anyone know what the fuel tank capacity is for ~a 1988 Crown Victoria? ~ ~Thank you.
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Jonathan Grobe wrote:

I had one. Published capacity for EFI models was 18 gallons, I could get almost 22 into it if I ran it down to empty(no, the fuel pump never failed...).
I think the carbed models were 21 gallons.
Rob
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I think that means you had a 21gal tank, not an 18....
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Mark wrote:

Like I said... "PUBLISHED"... and mine was EFI not carbed.
Our Taurus wagon has a 16 gallon "PUBLISHED" capacity, I've put over 20 gallons in it twice recently. Our Aerostar ran out once, it took just over 20 gallons in its 15 gallon tank.
So, it depends on your definition of "capacity"... cruise range is typically based on 90% of published capacity, which would be 389 miles for our Taurus, but I can go about 612 miles if it's all highway.
Rob
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DOT regulations:
c)(12) Overfill restriction. A liquid fuel tank manufactured on or after January 1, 1973, must be designed and constructed so that -- (c(12)(i) The tank cannot be filled, in a normal filling operation, with a quantity of fuel that exceeds 95 percent of the tank's liquid capacity; and
(c(12)(ii) When the tank is filled, normal expansion of the fuel will not cause fuel spillage.
Meaning the total liquid volume the tank can hold is not the "published" volume. Most if not all manufactures go well beyond this requirement for a number of reasons. One is cost. Many of the fuel tanks on Ford trucks are the same part number, so they are the same tank, yet you can have anywhere from one truck model having a tank with a 16 gallon tank too a 19 gallon tank. How is this possible? It all depends on how far into the tank the filler tube goes. The deeper the filler tube the less the tank will hold.
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On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 21:03:50 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

That's certainly not true. Not unless you are in a perfect airtight situation, which gas tank fill tubes are not.
Can you fill a glass with water through a straw up past the straw bottom? Of course you can.
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Mark opined in

I think he meant that the tank being a closed container, the thing wont fill past the tube
BUT....when did fillers start being placed through the top of the tank, anyway. All I ever saw, they enter through the side... and they dont curve down
--
- Yes, I'm a crusty old geezer curmudgeon.. deal with it! -

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Backyard Mechanic wrote:

The filler on my 1975 Datsun 280Z was straight down into the top of the tank. You could actually see into the tank (pre leaded blocker type filler - last new leaded gas car I bought). Easy to fill the tank full.
Ed
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wrote:

I'm sure it all depends on the make/model as to where the filler enters.
But, even if the tube enters in at the side, you can still fill past it quite easily. The tank is a closed container, but the tube allows plenty of air to allow a fill past it's entry point in the tank. No gas tank system is air tight when the cap is off.
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By law the fuel tank is very air tight and will hold a very large amount of pressure. The vent valve also is a two way valve it is designed to hold pressure. You can not fill the fuel tank past 95% of it's liquid volume by law, that is how it is designed. Yes you can squeeze a little more than the rated capacity, most of that extra in in the filler tube.
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On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 05:42:40 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

Not with the filler cap off and you are putting fuel in. It's a completely open system during filling. That was made very clear in my previous post.
Can you fill a tank with the cap on?
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No it's not a completely open system. The fuel nozzle is providing resistance to escaping gasses. Those gasses building pressure is what trips the fuelnozzle to cut off . Ever notice you can keep the fuel flowing by partially removing the nozzle from the fill neck? You can do that because you just created a larger opening for the gasses to escape. Notice how the fuel nozzle fits rather snug in the fill neck? It's supposed to be that way. One reason is to shut off the fuel flow at a predetermined pressure and to prevent gasses from escaping to atmosphere. Another one of those little laws. Some states carry that even further by using bellows that seal the fuel nozzle to the fill neck.

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On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 19:11:25 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

In a perfect world, maybe. In reality, not even close to providing a perfect airtight seal.
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Perfect enough that it works and very well. Do you know how pressure stops the fuel nozzle?
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"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message

With the standard fuel pump at the standard fuel station, you will never be able to over fill the tank. If you can get the fuel nozzle to not stop, you will only fill the fill neck to over fill and spill out, nothing more. You obliviously do not know why. You can't do it with a funnel and gas can as well. Do you know why? You will never be able to fill a fuel tank to it's total capacity. Meaning by law and design you will never be able to fill a fuel tank beyond 95% of it's total capacity with a gas station fuel delivery nozzle or a funnel and can.
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pick one wrote:

So... what do you say is the "total capacity" of my Taurus tank, rated at 16 gallons in the owners manual, but will take 20.2 gallons at a fill from empty?
Rob
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The tank by law can not hold more than 95% of it's total liquid capacity. So if you were to take out the filler tube seal the opening, take out the vent valve and fill the thing with liquid from the vent opening it will hold more than the 16 gallons in your owners manual. How much more? At least 5% more. But If I remember correctly the Taurus had a 18 gallon option. The 18 and 16 gallon tank have the same physical out size dimensions. Which means that it hill hold at least 5% more than 18 gallons. All fuel tanks by law have to have a space for expansion of vapors and crush ability when the tank is full so that it does not rupture. If the tank is completely full with no vapor space you can not crush it with out it splitting apart.
DOT regulations:
c)(12) Overfill restriction. A liquid fuel tank manufactured on or after January 1, 1973, must be designed and constructed so that -- (c(12)(i) The tank cannot be filled, in a normal filling operation, with a quantity of fuel that exceeds 95 percent of the tank's liquid capacity; and
(c(12)(ii) When the tank is filled, normal expansion of the fuel will not cause fuel spillage.
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"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message

My Dad had a '86 Olds 88. He could keep putting gas into it after it hit cap. (18 gal. IIRC), all it did was fill up the evap system and when it was parked, it leaked out the evap canister finally killing it. Mark
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Which means the tank vent valve did not work. If your story is true.
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