Gas Tank Fill Location All Wrong

Page 5 of 7  
wrote:


Too bad Oregon seems to grow (or is it cultivate?) such a miserable crop of human beings. We don't suffer the things you seem to, in other parts of the country.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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wrote:

I don't know what bazaro world you live in, but I find most people many times more careful with their own cars and their 3 plus dollar per gallon gas than any minimum wage flunkies pumping gas because it's the only job they can get.
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I know there was a full service island at the Arco at Glenoaks(?) and the northbound I-5 freeway onramp by the cemetary in San Fernando as recently as the 1990s.
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I'd still chap his ass for providing minimum service at a full service island, even get a manager involved if I had to. If I'm stopping at a full service island, it's because I don't want to do *any* of that myself that day.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

If that's all true, then we can have zero unemployment. Just mandate no self serve all over the country - force all unemployed to pump gas. Then all those people will magically get a paycheck, insurance, and benefits, and there's absolutely zero cost to anyone. Someone needs to tell Hillary about this!! :)
Something's not adding up here. You've just described a perpetual motion machine.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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I only know what I see. The absolute cheapest gas in Uxbridge MA is at Hellens Fuels, two to three cents cheaper than the self serve and they have from one to three people manning the pumps. You can make your own choice, but it seems silly to pay 3 a gallon more to freeze my ass off pumping my own.
My point is, self serve is touted to save money for the customer. MA stations are proof that it is possible to sell for the same price and offer pumping service. Self serve is a scam.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Self service isn't necessarily a scam. But the money to pay the pumpers and their benefits and taxes has to come from *somewhere* - either out of the owner's profits, or in his buying cheaper gas, or otherwise cutting costs somewhere (non-compliance with certain regulations?). Perhaps if you find out where the money comes from to pay the extra unavoidable costs, you'd find that *THAT'S* where the real scam is. But self-service in and of itself is certainly not a scam. Find out how and why the non-self-service stations are able to charge less. You can't just hand-wave those real costs away.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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IMO, as long as one station can pump gas for the same price as the self serve across the street, touting self service as a money saver is a scam. I don't know how, now do I care how they do it, stations did not lower the self serve price, they raised the full serve price.
When you back out the tax differences, the typical NJ stations pumps the gas for you at about the same price at the self serve in CT. Zone pricing makes apples to apples comparison difficult though. Just as the Shell station in my town is always12 less than the one 6 miles down the highway.
If you go back maybe 15 years, they tried to charge more for credit card purchases instead of cash. What happened to that deal? Now that you can pay at the pump they will take your cards at the same price. I've not figured out the benefit of the seller to have you pay at the pump. Convenient for the driver, but I'd have thought the sales of coffee and candy bars at the counter would be hurt by the reduced traffic.
Some stations, like a couple of local ones here in CT offer both. They inflate the full service by 30 a gallon to discourage people using it. Even more pathetic is the person that pulls up to the full serve pump and gets out and pumps it him or her self and pays the higher price. They don't look at the pump price.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Good question.
The station I was buying all my fuel from mounted speakers to the pumps blaring commercials at you while you pump your fuel. I now buy all my fuel from the station down the street that does not blast me with that crap. Fuel is same price, major brand.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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Bill Putney wrote:

Also - people are still going to go inside for their stupid tax (AKA: lottery tickets).
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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Arco mini-serve stations piss me off for that reason and I'll go to any other station nearby if it's an option. Part of minimum service is not making me get out of the car to pay...
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wrote in message >

Are you serious? If so, your definition of a scam is illogical, to say the least...

Most states have different sales tax rates in different communities.

Credit card companies put a stop to that, they will not let a merchant process credit cards if that merchant charges more for doing so. Just imagine how quick you would go out of business if you could not take plastic...

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Notice where I said "When you back out the tax differences"? I'm talking pure pre-tax selling price.

It was not credit card companies, but card holders of Mobile, Exxon, etc. They were charging more for using their own cards with the idea that it put more of the actual cost on the people using them. In reality, it should be that way. I get a 5% discount at my shoe store for paying cash. I like that.
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logic
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Huh?
There's still unemployment in OR. And I don't know any minimum wage jobs where the employees get insurance and benefits.
What your missing Bill is that retail gas prices differ from station to station depending on a number of factors OTHER than labor. As a point of fact, the biggest difference is due to pumped volume. The oil companies have rate schedules setup that give significantly lower prices to the higher pumping stations.
About a year ago the local paper interviewed the owner of the 5 highest pumping stations in the Portland Metro area to find out his secret. It was really very simple. The guy had figured out that gas prices were extremely price sensitive and differences of even a penny a gallon would cause dramatic differences in pumped volume. So what the guy would do is he would wake up at 3:00am every morning and drive around to all his stations, then drive past all the other gas stations that were within a few miles of his stations, and he would set his price to be at minimum a penny lower than the lowest price of any of his competitors. He did this every morning, 7 days a week, and as a result he had the highest pumped volume, and therefore was able to buy gas wholesale cheaper than anyone else, and thus, even though his prices were lower than everyone else, he made a profit. He wasn't particularly concerned with explaining all of this because in his words the other station owners were too lazy to get off their asses and look at their competitors prices, so he was not worried about them trying to beat him at his own game. His only regret was that none of his sons or daughters was really that interested in the gas station business, and he figured that when he died, that his kids would sell off the stations and that would be the end of his business.
If you really want to rail against this self-service ban you need to be railing at the oil companies. If they didn't do this fiddle-faddle with the wholesale pricing then all the station owners in a market would be buying fuel at the same cost, and then perhaps labor would become a more significant cost of business and eliminating it would perhaps actually make a difference in pump prices. But, as it is now, the pump prices are set by volume, and pumped volume of a station is not that related to the labor costs.
Ted
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Maybe where you live, but here in CT we have zone pricing. The same truck delivers gas to three stations but they all sell at a different price because of their location. If they can get more, they do. Near the MA border, prices are lower to compete with the 20 less in taxes. In the inner cities where they know the poor will not be traveling around, they get some of the highest prices. Some higher volume stations near the main highways are higher than the little guy up the road a bit.
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wrote in message

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Well of course we also have zone pricing but it's limited to the lower volume stations. I live within 2 miles of a high volume Astro station at a major intersection - it's prices are always within a few cents of the other high volume stations in the greater metro area. I can count probably about 10 stations like this that are within a mile of the places that I normally drive by when commuting. However, all other stations have much higher prices. There's a total of 3 stations I pass by when going to I84 (part of my commute) that are low-volume. One of these is a cash-only place and because of that they are able to stay within 2 cents higher than the high volume stations. The other 2 are at least 10 cents sometimes higher than any of the high volume stations, one time I saw one at 20 cents higher. One of those was playing the "cash discount" game where they advertised a lower price that was cash-only, and the higher credit card price was in a sign that was almost completely obscured by bushes, until the AG threatened to sue them unless they knocked it off - now they just have 1 price. Although even doing this their cash-only price was still higher than that of a high volume station 1/2 mile away.
In other areas of the metro area the same thing abounds. You can tell the low volume stations by the few number of pumps and the fewer number of cars that are always in them. I don't exactly know why anyone goes to them - but some do. A few of these stations do vehicle repair and obviously they make their living doing that, not selling gas. Some of the others have extensive beer refrigerators and I assume make their money selling that.
But in general, the high volume stations are all within 2-3 cents of each other and this is true just about every day of the year, no matter where the stations are located. But for every one of those stations, there's at least 5 more than are low volume stations which usually are no less than 10-15 cents a gallon higher.
Ted
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Ted Mittelstaedt wrote: <...>

Good service? Costumer loyalty? Going to a neighborhood store?
Jeff
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wrote in message

You have to compare all the variables, besides, there are absolutly different qualities of gas, and Astro sells one of the lowest...

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Back in the 1960's, there were many cars having the filler neck behind the rear license plate. My Dad's 1965 Dodge Coronet was this way. The plate mount was spring loaded. This enabled the vehicle to be filled from either side. Once the tanks had to be mounted further away from the rear for safety, that pretty much ended that.
-KM
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But most cars today have a little arrow on the fuel gauge, telling you which side the filler is on.

Also, it was down so low, fuel often overflowed out of the filler when filling, or when full. That's an emissions problem.

Jaguars used to have two tanks, with a filler on each rear fender.

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