Grand Marquis Brake Lines

I have a 1995 Grand Marquis and recently had to replace all the brake lines as they were badly corroded and leaking. It seems to me that brake lines should be able to survive more than 8+ years of service.
Is this a common problem with the Grand Marquis and should one normally expect a longer life?
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John West wrote:

Corroded and leaking where? Did YOU see it, or did a shop tell you that?
Bob
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Bob,
Major leak along the line on the underside by driver door. Lost all fluid. Vehicle towed to reputable local Ford Dealer who have done majority of all service work on the vehicle. No, did not specifically look at all lines before replacement
John
BOB URZ wrote:

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David West wrote:

I would be curious to exactly where the leak was and what they considered "ALL" the lines. Unless you had something abraid the lines from underneath or live in a very high salt state, lets say i am sceptical. There are different lines on a car. some metal , some rubber. I sort of doubt there ALL bad. So if someone told you they were all bad, the red flag goes up. It could just be a loose compression fitting. And a leak upstream could dribble brake fluid along the line to make a good section of line look bad because its wet.
I had to replace the front to back line on my 86 mazda B2000. You could see it was corroded and flaking rust. That caused a pin hole in the line which eventually caused a leak. But just a section of the line was that way. 1995 seems too new for this kind of fault.
I think you needed to get a more detailed explanation other than "All the lines were bad". And a look at the replaced parts. Granted, brakes are nothing to mess with because of safety issues. But i smell you may have been sold more than you needed to safely fix the problem.
Bob
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Hi, guys.
I have a 1994 Crown Victoria LX and had almost the same problem a couple of years ago. My wife and I drove to a B&B for Valentine's and when we got in the car the next morning, the brake pedal immediately went all the way to the floor. Both rear brake lines had corroded through, just behing the firewall, between the transmission bell housing and the frame.
Yes, I live in an area where salt is commonly spread on the roads during winter, but I get the car sprayed at Rust Check every year, and the car still looks almost new. I got it in Feb of '98 with 62,000km (38,000 mi) on it and it now has 331,000km (200,000 mi). The tranny and motor were just rebuilt about 2,000 km ago, but the rest of the car is in great shape. Aside from regular maintenance (at a reputable Ford dealership) and replacement of worn out parts, it has been a very dependable car.
CJ
David West wrote:

I would be curious to exactly where the leak was and what they considered "ALL" the lines. Unless you had something abraid the lines from underneath or live in a very high salt state, lets say i am sceptical. There are different lines on a car. some metal , some rubber. I sort of doubt there ALL bad. So if someone told you they were all bad, the red flag goes up. It could just be a loose compression fitting. And a leak upstream could dribble brake fluid along the line to make a good section of line look bad because its wet.
I had to replace the front to back line on my 86 mazda B2000. You could see it was corroded and flaking rust. That caused a pin hole in the line which eventually caused a leak. But just a section of the line was that way. 1995 seems too new for this kind of fault.
I think you needed to get a more detailed explanation other than "All the lines were bad". And a look at the replaced parts. Granted, brakes are nothing to mess with because of safety issues. But i smell you may have been sold more than you needed to safely fix the problem.
Bob
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This happened to my 1994 G.M. with anti-lock brakes last year. The brake and fuel lines had to be replaced (sold as a set) Had estimates for $1800 and up as the body had to be lifted off the frame and the possibility of some other components needing to be replaced along with the fuel and brake lines would bring the estimate even higher. All because of road salt damage. I ended up selling the car for salvage.

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brake line corrosion is a problem with all vehicles that are driven in areas where chloride salts are used to clear the roadways during the winters.
here's some pictures of the underside of a 1997 crown victoria that's been driven on heavily salted roads it's entire life.
http://www.crownvicland.com/pics/97pi/croppedPICT0160-or.jpg
http://www.crownvicland.com/pics/97pi/brandedcroppedPICT0161-or.jpg
John West wrote:

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