How smart are you?

Found this link: http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest3.html
Take all the tests and see. A few questions i thought were not quite correct in there interpretation.
BOB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BOB URZ wrote:

Whoa...I probably wouldn't pass the ASE test again...
Gerard
--
Gerard's Automobile Book, Video, and DVD Store
http://www.bob2000.com/booksvids.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Excellent link! Thank you for posting it! MN

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

THAT is a good link. I did OK, missed a couple on that one, more on the other pages:
Try these too:
http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest1.html http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest2.html http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest4.html http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest5.html http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest6.html http://www.autoshop101.com/asetest/asetest7.html
Well, you get the picture...
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3 of the answers are wrong for the second test:
19. I've measured parasitic loads of well over 100mA, and they didn't say that early 1980s cars were specifically exluded.
10, 22. They assumed that all analog meters were the low-imedance type, but they're ignoring FET-VOMs, which have input impedances of 10 megaohms, just like digital meters. I have a Triplett Micropower and a Radio Shack VOM modified with a FET amplifier, and Protek still sells an analog FET-VOM. I can't always use a digital meter because often give grossly wrong errors at even moderately high frequencies.
On the other hand I missed 6 on the first test:
4. I assumed that the normal acid concentration was 75% (really stupid since choosing the right answer for the question #1 revealed it);
12. 5 seconds seemed too short for a load test since batteries are specified for 30 seconds, and I can't believe that overheating would be a problem
15. I didn't know that 12.2V was 50% charge
21. I thought that a battery that dipped to 8.9V on load test could be recharged
24. Midtronics? I never heard of that company.
26. I didn't know the normal color of the Delco hydrometer eye since there is no eye on the Wal-mart versions, and the only one I had would be either green (OK), red (weak), or clear (dead). This was a Japanese battery, and the hydrometer could be unscrewed and placed into any other cell.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Voltage only Truly reflects "charge" if you are using a capacitive (no load) voltmeter.

It's not how low it dips, it's the recovery point that determines if a recharge is in order. The dip depends on internal resistance and the external load, if any!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What's a passing grade? I didn't get below 80% on any of the tests, and I sure don't know much about cars. Is that why so many ASE certified mechanics are bad?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Question #26 appears to be incorrect. It sez:
An AC Delco battery with a built in hydrometer is being checked. Technician A says that a DARK GREEN eye indicates the battery is sufficiently charged for further testing. Technician B says that a CLEAR hydrometer eye means the battery must be replaced.
And the correct answer is supposed to be "B". "Correct. A clear or light yellow hydrometer eye indicates the battery is low on electrolyte and should be replaced."
However, that indictor is NOT a hydrometer, it is an electrolyte level indicator. Therefore, the answer "B" is incorrect. Indeed, the earlier Question #17 correctly defines what a hydrometer is:
"Correct, a hydrometer is used to measure the specific gravity of the electrolyte."
Anybody here old enough to remember rechargeable batteries for radios that had three different density balls floating in the electrolyte? (You could judge the state of charge by noting which balls were floating.)
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.