Hybrid awd

Hi,
I wonder if awd hybrids, like: Lexus RX Hybrid Awd, Toyota Highlander Hybrid Awd, Ford Escape Hybrid Awd, etc. - can handle snow, ice as well as
non-hybrid awd vehicles. Or (if *real* winter traction needed) is diesel the way to go? - the goal here is to get better mpg than gasoline-based awd vehicles can currently achieve.
Thanks, Boris
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If I'm not mistaken they use traction motors like railway locomotives use only much smaller of course. I don't see why they can't be just as good as the old non-hybrid design. My concern would be how exposed to damage are the components, how expensive are they to fix and will the parts be available for a long time. The technology is moving fast in this area of hybrid design so components change quickly in my view at least. I'd hate to see my forty or fifty thousand dollar vehicle rendered obsolete in a few years because the special design parts are no longer available.
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You're mistaken.
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Then what do they use?
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http://lmgtfy.com/?q=prius+drivetrain
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

A Prius is not a valid comparison since it is not an AWD vehicle and this is specifically what the OP called for. In a more valid example, a Lexus 400H in this case, the front wheels can be driven by the gasoline engine and an electric motor (separately or together) while the rear wheels are driven exclusively by another electric motor. Thus, "traction motor" is valid for at least half of the vehicle's drive train.
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John McGaw
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John McGaw wrote:

Besides the hybrid AWD versus non-hybrid AWD, there's also the issue of AWD versus 4WD.
I've seen first hand the difference, in snow and ice, between the AWD on a Honda Pilot, and the 4WD on a Toyota 4Runner. The difference is dramatic, in favor of the manually selected 4WD versus the automatic AWD.
The Pilot has a lame AWD system which automatically engages the rear wheels _after_ the system senses loss of traction. You can manually engage it, but it will disengage over 18 MPH. I've seen people do 360s in a Pilot on an icy road because by the time the AWD engages it's too late, and they can't leave it on unless they go really slow.
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Fortunately for the OP, the AWD system in Toyotas and Lexus works above 18 MPH.
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Ray O
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In the first place I wasn't referring to the prius although they could be the same principal.
Here's what it says about the Highlander:
Toyota Highlander Hybrid Review Wikicars, a place to share your automotive knowledge Driving a Toyota Highlander Hybrid takes some getting used to. All the controls work the same as in any other Highlander, but the sounds which emanate and the feel are unique. The Toyota Highlander Hybrid has some notable differences. After turning the ignition on (by twisting the key), "READY" lights up on the dashboard. Driving away, the Highlander Hybrid's computer automatically starts and stops the gas engine as needed. The Highlander can run on pure battery power at low speeds such as in stop and go traffic. In instances like these, fuel economy gets better, which is the exact opposite of conventional vehicles.
Power delivery is nearly instant, and performance levels are within some of the best available in the crossover SUV segment, Hybrid or otherwise. The Highlander Hybrid's powertrain is identical to that developed for the Lexus RX 400h. The dual-cam V6 is modified to utilize an electric air conditioning compressor and power steering pump instead of conventional belt driven ones. This modified V6 alone produces 208 HP and 212 lb-ft of torque. Coupled to the V6 is an electric motor that turns the front wheels making the equivalent of 167 hp and 247 lb-ft of torque. All-wheel-drive (AWD) Highlander Hybrid's, have a third electric motor aboard to drive the rear wheels if and when the Hybrid Synergy Drive detects slippage in the front wheels. It can respond to conditions by electronically distributing power from front to rear, reducing power to the front as the rear traction motor is turned on. That third motor generates 50 kW, or 68 HP and 98 lb-ft of torque. The sum of all these powertrains is the equivalent of 268 HP. Supplying electricity to run the motors is a direct-current nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery, stored beneath the second-row seat. The electric motor(s) can act as generators to capture the kinetic energy of heat from braking. It can then be transformed into electricity when returned to the battery for recharge."
Traction motors on rail locomotives operate in a similar fashion, the idea is the same:
"1. What is a diesel locomotive? Actually, it is more properly called a diesel-electric locomotive. The concept is relatively simple: An oil-burning engine turns an alternator or generator which in turn produces electricity that powers traction motors that connect to the axles of the locomotive. This process is much more efficient than the external-combustion steam locomotive."
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First of all, I dont own a hybrid car/suv.
On the HSD at winter time or any given day, the engine will have to warm up first, so during winter time you may use the engine more often than normal. But still the hybrid will have better fuel economy during winter.
The highlander Hybrid is NOT a full time four wheel drive car. But the rear wheels do have an electric motor than can give traction when required. The gas-based model of the 4X4 highlander is full time four wheel drive. 4X4 on demand and fulltime 4X4 is alot different in *real* winter traction. Even Toyota says " The Highlander Hybrid is not designed to be driven off-road."
Diesel and hybrid mpg really depends on your trips. If you do a lot of city driving the Hybrid will be better, if you do mostly highway driving the diesel is much better. In our area, diesel is cheaper than regular unleaded and much cheaper that premium unleaded. consider this when buying a lexus hybrid and a regular premium gas Rx or consider the diesel Audi or Volkswagen.

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In that case the driver would lose some traction when part of the system is offline. So systems like the Highlander is not technically an "AWD" but should be called "4WD". And that's what Toyota calls it. In any case it applies only to acceleration and not to braking.
Inexperienced drivers lured into a false sense of security are more likely to get into accidents in 4/AWD, because they think they can move better but their braking and steering performance are similar to 2WD.

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AWD hybrids can handle ice and snow as well as non-hybrid AWD vehicles, although AWD hybrids are not designed for off-road use. Winter traction is more a function of the type and condition of the tires than the type of propulsion system. With the same quality tires, you would not notice a difference in traction between a hybrid and conventional AWD vehicle of the same model.
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In cold climates, theoretically, on a fully charged battery you can start going right away versus waiting for ages before the gasoline engine warms up. With a parallel hybrid at least. And no, despite my claim, I don't like priuses.
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In cold climates, theoretically, on a fully charged battery you can start going right away versus waiting for ages before the gasoline engine warms up. With a parallel hybrid at least. And no, despite my claim, I don't like priuses.
*********** Even in cold climates, it is not necessary to wait for a gasoline engine to warm up before driving.
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In cold climates, theoretically, on a fully charged battery you can start going right away versus waiting for ages before the gasoline engine warms up. With a parallel hybrid at least. And no, despite my claim, I don't like priuses.
** why would you wait for ages for the gasoline engine t warm up. It isn't necessary. Just git up and go.
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I'm old fashioned. I wait 5 or 6 seconds for oil to get to the top of the engine before pulling away.
Jon
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And you classifiy that as ages?
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