Location of DLC on 94 Taurus

I borrowed a code reader but can't find where to plug it in. Does anyone know? It's not on Google , not in the owner's manual or in the Haynes Manual I bought.
Thanks for any info,
Drew P. Droz
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Iver Setah Goatlips wrote:

It's under the hood - in the engine compartment, right between the intake manifold and the firewall, next to the passenger-side strut tower. There are two connectors of interest: one is a 6-pin connector, and the other is a single pin connector. They may be stuck into a single gray or black plastic hood/cover embossed with "EEC Test".
Rob
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Thanks - I found the EEC Test box but the code reader wouldn't plug in to it. Different size connections. The reader I borrowed from AutoZone said the data link Connector should be under the dash on the driver's side or if not there a tag should be there giving the location, but we couldn't find either. Cars sure have got more complicated since I retired in December '85. I ran a foreign auto repair shop from '67 to '85 and was my own head mechanic. Taught a lot of guys to be mechanics. This car belongs to one of my grandsons. Died on the highway and he burned out the starter trying to start it. We replaced that but the fuel pump won't work unless we put 12 volts to the pink/black wire coming from the relay module and we can't get any spark, even by putting 12 volts to the red/green wire coming from the relay module. Putting voltage there does start the cooling fan but it shouldn't as far as I can make out. That's why we borrowed the OBD II AutoScanner but now we have to plug it in. It has D shaped male end with 7 skinny pins in 2 rows with gaps between some of them.
Drew P. Droz
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94 Taurus (or any other Ford for of that vintage) will be EEC-IV, not OBDII. OBDII started in late 95 or 96. You can use an EEC-IV code reader, but there isn't really need for that. A test light and a paper clip are just as good. Tons of info on the web how to do this and how to interpret the codes. Just google for EEC-IV diagnostics or some such. Incidentally, the test connector has a pin for testing the fuel pump, bypassing the ECM.
Be warned that EEC-IV most likely will not self-diagnose for ignition problems.
If I may, seems that you better consult the EVTM (electrical schematics booklet) and apply some systematic troubleshooting procedure before blindly applying battery voltage here and there. This is a fuel injected, computer controlled engine, and there is a good chance that you will damage something and make the problem worse than it is.

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