Looking for a mid-size domestic car recommendation

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:


Thats why they are German owned now. After the merger the high up major stock holders in America sold all their stock and retired. The majority of stock is now owned by high up executives in Germany so that is why they are no longer considered an American company.

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Some statistics about distribution of shareholding:
Germany 55.4% Europe, without Germany 20.7% USA 16.2% Others 7.7%
Shareholders exceeding 5 % total 17.6% Deutsche Bank AG 10.4% Emirate of Kuwait 7.2%
Free Float 82.4% Institutional Investors 54.4% Private Investors (1.8 million) 28.0%
I don't think there are a lot of "high up executives" as shareholders, though it is correct to state that only a minority of the shares are held in the USA. I don't know who holds the 17.6% of shares not quoted.
It won't surprise you to know that the Kuwaiti government shareholding sometimes gets controversial...
More info:
http://www.daimlerchrysler.com/dccom/0,,0-5-7196-1-70868-1-0-0-0-0-0-36-7164-0-0-0-0-0-0-0,00.html
DAS
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For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

and a few others held majority shares and controlling interest. Post merger they all sold off their stock and retired and the stock was bought up mostly overseas. After making the mistake of buying one Chrysler and having to replace most of the Mitsubishi parts in it I won't make the same mistake again weather its owned my Americans or anyone else :)
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Interesting about Chrysler, but Daimler-Benz never had significant executive shareholders, AFAIK. The biggest single 'private' shareholder is the Kuwaiti govt, via its investment vehicle.
DAS
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For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 15:27:49 +0100, "Dori A Schmetterling"

Of course the executives are not shareholders. They don't mind the income, but they sure aren't tying their futures to the companies. :-)

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Clare - What year Mystique? I have owned and maintained a '96 Mystique and a '98 Contour (Ford's Mystique) for several years now for my daughters, and so am familiar with their peculiarities. A very good enthusiast site for Contours/Mystiques (or more affectionately known as "Contiques") is www.contour.org, complete with discussion forums and years of searchable archives.
One reason that I ask what year you have is that there was a serious flaw in under-hood wiring in '95 thru '97 MY's which I may be able to give you some pointers on (both in recognizing symptoms of and fixing).
Bill Putney (to reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with "x")
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wrote:

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Brad Clarke wrote:

From my reading of their forums for a couple of years, not if the fluid is changed on a reasonably regular basis, but, yes you do read of a failure every now and then, like on any car forum of whatever brand. I've not had any tranny problems. I did have the fluid changed once on both the '96 and the '98.
Bill Putney (to reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with "x")
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wrote:

lobbying Ford to fix the transmissions.
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Brad Clarke wrote:

That may be the case - I just don't recall reading much about it. If that is the case, it would show up in a search of the forum on www.contour.org.
Bill Putney (to reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with "x")
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wrote:

It is a '96 that has had all the recall campaigns done. Ir DOES need a left front wheel bearing - I though MABEE I heard something when I bought it. We have done 2 pretty good trips with it, and now I'm SURE I'm hearing a bearing. Has 93,000Km on it now.
This car seems to be an excellent replacement for the Mark Cross Brougham, complete with full leather upholstery. (4th out of 5 cars I've bought for the wife with leather - '76 Monarch Ghia (white leather) '85 Mark Cross T&C Wagon, '88 Mark Cross Brougham, and now the Mystique. (had a very good '81 Corolla wagon after the Ghia, with fabric seats - which were starting to get pretty badly sun baked by the time we sold it)
The '85 T&C totally rotted away, leaving a good 2.6 Mitsu (rebuilt by me) and inerior which I sold 10 years ago - and were still on the road as recently as a couple months ago.

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On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 02:00:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Make that a Landau.

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On Sun, 15 Aug 2004, James C. Reeves wrote:

Perhaps not by you, but you are not "most".
Cars built in North America of primarily North American parts are considered "domestic" for legal purposes, regardless of whether the nameplate says "Dodge" or "Nissan" or whatever.
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Daniel J. Stern wrote:

do assemble some of them here. The final assembly of a car is a very small part of the whole product when you add in all the parts such as design, testing, project management, etc. Companies like then are still majority owned by Japanese banks with the majority of profit and jobs going back into the Japanese economy. They ship most of the parts here and do the final assembly so they can market them as American to fool consumers.
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| On Sun, 15 Aug 2004, James C. Reeves wrote: | | > You can knock Chrysler off your list...Daimler owns them now (German), | > so it is no longer considered "domestic" by most. | | Perhaps not by you, but you are not "most". | | Cars built in North America of primarily North American parts are | considered "domestic" for legal purposes, regardless of whether the | nameplate says "Dodge" or "Nissan" or whatever. |
The car may be "domestic", from a legal definition, however the company that produced it is not. A larger percentage of the profits, as a general rule, leave the US on its way to the high wage salaries, R&D, design teams, etc. of the host country where the HQ is location as a result.
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"James C. Reeves" wrote:

Versus a high percentage lining the pockets of fat cats in Michigan?
Ed
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C. E. White wrote:

You got a problem with that?
--Geoff
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Geoff wrote:

Yes. For instance:
"Wagoner's total 2002 compensation package reached $14.7 million in 2002, compared with $7.43 million in 2001, when the company failed to achieve financial targets, according to the company's proxy released Thursday."
Do you really think the guy running GM is worth $14.7 million dollars? I don't.
Ed
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C. E. White wrote:

I don't think it's any of my damn business what he or anyone else earns in their paycheck. His salary is the result of a deal struck between that Wagoner and his employer, and he was well-served to negotiate the best deal for himself that he could, whether you or I or anyone else thinks that he's 'worth' that or not. Obviously, if the board of directors thought he was overpaid, they'd cut his salary. If they were somehow in cahoots together and the overly large salaries were really causing actual harm to the company, the stock price would plummet as the company failed to perform. These things have not happened, so I think it is fair to conclude that Mr. Wagoner has struck a fair deal for himself with General Motors, which in case you didn't know, is currently the largest automobile manufacturer *in the world*. Would I want fourteen million dollars to live with the headache of running and being made accountable for an operation that large? You're goddamned right I would, and I think I would deserve it. Half of the freaking State of Michigan is relying upon that man to make good decisions and keep the General Motors empire -- with finances larger than many individual countries -- rolling along making a profit. *My* income depends, in part, on his making good decisions.
Do you mean to tell me that GM shouldn't reward an individual for an effort of that magnitude?
Do you mean to tell me that GM shouldn't try to attract the best and the brightest among us to positions that have that sort of responsibility?
Do you mean to tell me that GM should place that sort of responsibility in the hands of somebody who's willing to do the job cheap?
Do you mean to tell me that somehow *your own* contribution to society at large is commensurate with his, and therefore he is not deserving of his salary because *you* do not make as much?
What I would like to know is who nominated you as being the arbiter of who should get paid and how much? I would also like to know how your system of values has gotten so completely f**ked over that you think that the people who *make it possible* for half of an entire state to have good employment, homes over their heads, food in their mouths and educations for their children shouldn't get paid more than X dollars, regardless of what X happens to be. Are the people of the State of Michigan unimportant to you, because they happen to be distant from where you are? Is America's industrial economy something that is to be subject to the snivelling whims of people such as yourself who think that the fat cat CEOs are overpaid and 'there outta be a law?'! Do you think the shareholders of GM are so stupid they are willing to let Mr. Wagoner rip them off?
Thankfully, folks such as you *aren't* running the country. I can only hope that this condition persists in November.
I'll tell you one more thing while I'm at it: I don't make $14 million dollars a year. You probably don't make $14 million dollars a year either. Want to know why? Because neither one of us has the talent, drive, skill, experience, willingness and commitment that Mr. Wagoner manifests in his daily life. That's why he is WORTH $14 million a year, and you and I aren't. Period. I'm happy with what I earn. I would suggest that if you aren't happy with you earn, that you do something about it, and quit complaining about those who have risen to the top. That won't get you anywhere, and it sure as hell doesn't help anyone else either.
--Geoff
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Geo. wrote:

If the world was a fair place, I wouldn't care what executives make. However, most large corporations are run like the '60 era Soviet Union. The Board of Directors are members of an exclusive club and they slap each other on the back while running their corporate empires for their personal benefit. Sometimes, a few crumbs reach the average investor, but that is usually a mistakle that is rectified in the next quarter. Board of Directories routinely reward incompetence with huge raises and sweet heart stock deals. They are little more than reverse Robin Hood Gangs - steal from the poor and give to the rich. If stock holders exercised any real control, then I could live with it. But for the most part, small investors are just gambling when they invest in the stock market. The big players (banks, mutuals, etc.) are all part of the big Casino that people think is a stock market. They make sure they (the BIG boys) get theirs and they don't give a d%^m about the little guy, except to have him feed more money into their coffers so that they can live like a Sultan. Having kept a job during the reign (and I do mean reign) of one of the greatest flim flam artist of the 20th century, I can tell you that the picture from the bottom of the food chain is a lot different than the one portrayed in the media. When you aren't allowed to buy pencils for a month, because the company must make arbitrary 3rd quarter numbers, or some other such nonsense, you know the people running the company are insane, or that they are cooking the books to make themselves look good.
Ed
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