messed up fuel line fitting at fuel filter

messed up fuel line fitting at fuel filter
I was trying to replace the fuel filter on my ford ranger 3.0. The fuel filter is easy to access. The fuel line that comes from the output of
the fuel tank came off easily from the input of the fuel filter. I just pulled off a little plastic keeper and the line came right off. The output of the filter (going towards the engine)to the fuel line was another story!
It's some kind of one way fitting, that I'm sure now, must require a special tool to remove it. (I don't understand why one end comes off easily and the other is attached in a more complicated way. Both ends should have the same pressure. Anyway, I messed it up taking it off.
Any suggestions on how to fix this? Just hack off the ruined metal fitting to where it's regular fuel line hose and then use a hose clamp?
I'm trying to understand what the purpose is of this special fitting.
thx!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

bob
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wrote:

Yup, that would have been the tool of choice. It's not going to do much good now though. Bob
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Well, considering that these fuel systems operate in the 40 PSI range and can, in some cases, dead head over 100 PSI...... a hose clamp would be about enough to turn your truck into a ticking time bomb....
If, by some chance, you haven't destroyed the "bell" of the fitting, you should be able to get a replacement retainer spring from your Ford dealer.
If the bell of the fitting is damaged, you may be able to find aftermarket replacement fittings.... I can't vouch for them....
Why do so many people seem driven to destroy something before asking for assistance?

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It's not clear to me why one end of the filter has a slip fit with a plastic keeper but the other end is so robust. Seems like the pressure would be the same on either side, no?
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Who knows what evil lurks in the heart and mind of an engineer.... Even on the new ones we see a mix of line connections in any given system that can only be described as "eclectic" (whatever that means... but I hear it a lot on decorating shows).
Whether it is an electrical connector or a tubing connector..... if we are unfamiliar with the design or function, we need to research it somehow. With what we see on new vehicles, we yearn for the older connections featuring the plastic "horseshoe" that slips inside slots in the bell. These were rarely susceptible to problems from dirt inside the connection. Ford is currently favouring two styles of fuel line connections.... both can collect debris making it hard to separate the lines without time lost to cleaning the fittings.

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my job to keep from getting killed), I can only guess that the reason two different fittings are used is to keep people from installing the filter backwards. Don't know for sure, but seems plausible.
SC Tom
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The funny thing is (maybe not that funny...) is that both ends of the fuel filter are identical. You could still put it on backwards and go on your merry way!
I looked at the manual, and they are explicit about not using standard fuel line. Only special teflon line and stainless steel.
I think I'm looking at a new line from ford (i bet $75) or if I can find a wrecking yard with one...
SC Tom wrote:

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handyman is quite right.... Ford has and does use several different styles of line couplers.... three of them (sized for 8mm line)are very different in design and function yet take the same filter nipple.

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A few weeks ago I had an older Bronco in with an intermittently sticking regulator. When the regulator stuck closed the pressure would jump to right at 150 PSI. He put up with that problem for quite some time..... I can't believe he didn't kill the pump. Bob

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

One "handyman" to another, Bob.....
Comes a time in automotives when the generalist learns that you HAVE to crawl out from under and make that trip to the Auto Parts store to get the right tools.
Sorta like working on your car with nothing but Vise grips and a crescent wrench... you wont get much satisfaction.
Why one side uses an external clip and the other an internal keeper is beyond me, but it's not an accident. Been that way for a long time.
Since these fittings have been universally used for the last 15 years.....
Also what you are likely to find at Autozone, etc are the nylon fitting release 'bobbin-looking' tools on a holder bar. They are a pita, but with patience, they work ok.
--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
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