Mileage drop in winter

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Should your mileage drop considerably in the winter? I have a 2005 Escape, and the mileage seems to have dropped quite a bit when the cold weather hit.
Temps are around 20 or less, and I'm getting 16 mpg in normal driving. Tomorrow I have to take a road trip and I'll check it again. Last summer I was getting around 22 mpg in the same type of driving.
I beginning to feel like the other owners who say they love the car, but they seem to be stopping for gas all the time.
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On Wed, 5 Jan 2011 21:24:47 -0700, "Sheldon"

Yes, it is totally normal to get lower gas mileage when it is cold. Worse when mostly short runs.
The biggest problem with the Escape is the tank is not big enough. It is not an economy car by any stretch of the imagination, but you could go a lot farther with a 60 liter tank.
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wrote:

Since I have a 61L tank in my '02 Escape 3.0 L FWD, and the OP has a 62L tank in his '05, that's a pretty silly statement. I don't think putting in a smaller fuel tank is going to get either one of us a greater range. Unless you're suggesting an additional 60L tank :-)
Even here in the south, my mileage drops about 1 to 2 MPG in the winter. My biggest mileage drop came after I retired. Now most of my driving is in a 10 mile radius from home with speeds rarely going over 45MPH. When I was working, I was almost evenly mixing highway and local, and I was getting quite a bit better mileage than I am now, even in the winter.
Another factor that killed my mileage was when all of the stations around here finally went to an gasoline/ethanol mix, and I could no longer get straight gasoline. Over the years, from when I bought my Escape new to the addition of ethanol to my retirement, I have seen my city mileage go from 19 to 18 to 17. Just the advent of the ethanol mix dropped my highway mileage from 24 to about 21. I only have 72K miles on it, and it has been very well maintained, so I don't think much of that drop has come from wear and tear.
SC Tom
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I thought they had a smaller tank - at least the early ones. My mistake.

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wrote:

Thanks for all the background info. Today I went from a ski resort in the mountains down to Denver and got 21 mpg. I was expecting better, but I do have to go over two mountain passes -- Vail Pass and Eisenhower Tunnel. Much of that climbing was done in 2nd gear, but the Escape went up no problem at a good rate of speed (V6). I also live at 8000 feet, which can't help either. I assume driving at 80 doesn't help much.
I think you and others could be right, about the winter gasoline mix. I think I'll check my tire pressures, too. I got new tires and put in the recommended pressures when it was very cold outside, but the pressures may have dropped since then. FYI, I looked up the official fuel mileage for a 2005 Escape, and the numbers have been adjusted to match the way they are testing cars "now." I think you all know they used to throw them up on a treadmill, and with the more realistic tests mileage dropped on most vehicles a lot. A 2005 Escape should get 16 city, and 20 highway, so I'm right in the ballpark. Combined is only 17. I think when I got the car I was looking at the manufacturers mileage figures for that era. Also, FYI, my research says the tank is 16.5 gallons (US).
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wrote:

The window sticker for my '02 says 19 city and 24 highway. Then in small print underneath it says: "Actual mileage will vary with options, driving conditions, driving habits and vehicle's condition. Results reported to EPA indicate that the majority of vehicles with these estimates will achieve between 16 and 22 mpg in the city and between 20 and 28 mpg on the highway."
I've gotten 19 city, but not regularly, and never since the forced advent of the ethanol mix. I got 24 on trips to Florida shortly after I bought it, and that was with my luggage and my S.O.'s (and she likes to pack for a month on a week long vacation). Since then, I get about 22-23 on the highway. I usually get better mileage coming back, so maybe they don't put as much "winterizer" in Florida gas as they do in South Carolina gas, which shouldn't have much anyhow LOL! It's not like we have winters here like we did in Ann Arbor (thank <insert deity of your choice>!). Those winters were one of the reasons I moved to the south.
16.5 gallons is approximately 62 liters. -- SC Tom
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On 1/6/11 10:11 PM, Sheldon wrote:

No, driving at 80 hurts. The faster you go, the more fuel you use to go the same distance.

The Explorer is a truck, not a car.
Jeff
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He is talking about an Escape. And for my edification, what would be the major difference between a V6 Escape with all wheel drive and a theoretical AWD V6 Fusion Station Wagon.....
Just for the record, I ahve an AWD V6 Fusion sedan, and my mileage is not much better than he is getting with his Escape.
Ed
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On 1/7/11 7:09 AM, C. E. White wrote:

The Escape is a truck, too. My bad. There's not that much difference, but it's still a truck.
Jeff
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Well explain what makes it a truck...other than some goverment rules that lets you call some things a trucks (like a PT Cruiser) and other things cars. Here is a comparison of dimensions...
2010 Escape 4dr 2010 Fusion 4 dr Front-wheel Drive XLS Front-wheel Drive Sedan SE MSRP $21,020 $21,225 Fuel tank capacity 16.5 gal. 17.5 gal Fuel economy city 22 mpg 22 mpg Fuel economy hway 28 mpg 31 mpg Curb weight 3,268 lbs. 3,285 lbs. GVWR 4,300 lbs. 4,473 lbs. Towing capacity 1,500 lbs. NR Exterior length 174.7" 190.6" Exterior body width 71.1" 72.2" Exterior height 67.9" 56.9" Wheelbase 103.1" 107.4" Front tread 60.7" 61.7" Rear tread 60.2" 61.3" Turning radius 18.3' 18.7' Front legroom 41.6" 42.3" Rear legroom 35.6" 37.1" Front headroom 40.4" 38.7" Rear headroom 39.2" 37.8" Front hiproom 53.3" 54.0" Rear hiproom 49.1" 53.3" Front shoulder room 56.6" 57.4 Rear shoulder room 55.9" 56.5 Passenger volume 99.5 cu.ft. 100.3 cu.ft.
The dimensions are very similar - the Fusion is longer and wider, the Escape a little taller. Both weight about the same, both have almost identical GVWRs. The Escape is rated to tow 1500 lbs, while towing is not recommended for the Fusion. I suspect this is more spec'manship that anythig inherent in the design. The Europen Ford Mondeo (~ the size of a Fusion) is rated to tow 680 kg (~1500 lb) at a minimum. Too bad they don't offer a Fusion wagon (they offer a Mondeo Wagon in the UK - it looks very nice).
Both the Fusion and Escape use unit body construction (no separate frame). Both are primarily front wheel drive with an AWD option. They use the same engines. Why is one a truck and one a car? I see no logical reason for clasifying them as different types of vehicles beyond some 30+ year old goverment regulations that might have made sense when truck were mostly commerical vehicles and cars were what people drove on a daily basis for commuting and pleasure.
Ed
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I realize my Escape is technically a truck, as are most SUV's. I just call it a car because if I call it a truck my friends will think I'm showing up in a huge vehicle with a large bed in the back. I've been told for years, most "trucks" were excempt from mileage requirements the government imposed. They were also excempt from most safety features, too.
I just read an article that said the new government standards for fuel consumption will use the old methods of determining gas mileage (with the high numbers), but the window stickers will continue to use the new methods (with the lower numbers).
BTW, I just filled up the tank from my trip back and it actually got better mileage climbing up from Denver (22 mpg). Go figure. I don't have OCD, and I don't normally check every tank, but when I saw that 16 mpg I thought it might be wise to do some checking. Otherwise the "truck" runs great. It's been a great vehicle for me. Plenty of power, handles well, with room for my stuff, the dog, me and a passenger. :-)
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That's kinda the way I feel. Mainly I think I call it "car" because this the first SUV I've ever owned. Mostly I think of pick-ups and such as trucks. Everything else just kinda falls under "car."
I'm not OCD (well, maybe a little), but I keep track of everything I do to my vehicle (there, that's better :-) ) just because it helps me see when things may not be acting right. -- SC Tom
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I hear ya. I was thinking if the mileage was slipping it might be a symptom of something else. So far the car is fantastic, and I love the V6 power. It's no Ferrari, but I think I surprise a lot of people when I'm merging into traffic. I see them start pulling into the left lane, and by the time I'm up to speed I'm way ahead of them.
Here's a good one. Why the hell does a Mustang with a V6, or a V8, get better mileage than my Escape. Seems kinda strange.

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Gearing podner, gearing!!!! DaveD

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On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 19:27:50 -0700, "Sheldon"

not geared for load carrying, and much better aerodynamics. The escape is like a brick, aerodynamucally speaking.
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On 1/7/11 5:53 PM, Sheldon wrote:

Checking your gas mileage every time doesn't mean you have OCD.
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Only because nobody wants to admit having OCD. :-D
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<<<snip>>>>
We are all aware of that. You're the first one to mention an Explorer. Is that what you have?
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On 1/5/11 11:24 PM, Sheldon wrote:

Yes, it takes longer for the engine to heat up. And until it heats up, it is less efficient. In addition, the winter formulation of gasoline may reduce the mileage as well.
Jeff
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The A/C probably runs any time you are in Defrost mode. If you have a 4 cylinder Escape, that might make a substatntial difference.
My 2005 Escape Hybrid is at about 27.8 instead of 28.3 in the last couple of months. For me, not only is the A/C running, but the engine is on all the time in defrost modes as well.
--
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley Lake, CA, USA GPS: 38.8,-122.5

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