new ethanol studies

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clare at snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:


Uhhhh corn "is" the grain they are finished on. also poultry is the no 1 for cases of E-coli by far. and it is all in the processing not the raising that is the cause most of the time. KB

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On Fri, 21 Dec 2007 04:23:50 +0000 (UTC), Kevin Bottorff

E. coli O157:H7 is commonly found in cattle and poultry, and outbreaks have of disease have been associated with cattle and bovine products. There are reports of contamination from unpasteurized apple juice, hamburger meat, radish sprouts, lettuce, and potatoes, as well as other food sources. Environmental contamination may occur in water drained from cattle pastures or water containing human sewage used for drinking or swimming. Human to human transmission, through contact with fecal matter, has also been identified in daycare centers.
Chicken is related to SALMONELLA. E-Coli is referred to as "Hamburger Desease"
There is GRAIN FED and CORN FED beef. There is GRAIN FINISHED and CORN FINISHED beef.
CORN FED is fed on corn sileage - stocks, cobs, kernels and all. GRAIN FED is grain corn - kernels only, often mixed with Soy Beans, barley, and other grains. Sometimes whole and sometimes milled. Corn or Grain finished is beef fed corn or grain supplements along with grass (or hay) (which is often also a mixture of legumes such as peas and alfalfa)
Range fed, grain finished is my choice.

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On Fri, 21 Dec 2007 17:46:55 -0500, clare at snyder.on.ca wrote:
Author and small-scale cattleman Michael Pollan wrote recently in the New York Times about what happens to cows when they are taken off of pastures and put into feedlots and fed grain:
"Perhaps the most serious thing that can go wrong with a ruminant on corn is feedlot bloat. The rumen is always producing copious amounts of gas, which is normally expelled by belching during rumination. But when the diet contains too much starch and too little roughage, rumination all but stops, and a layer of foamy slime that can trap gas forms in the rumen. The rumen inflates like a balloon, pressing against the animal's lungs. Unless action is promptly taken to relieve the pressure (usually by forcing a hose down the animal's esophagus), the cow suffocates.
A corn diet can also give a cow acidosis. Unlike that in our own highly acidic stomachs, the normal pH of a rumen is neutral. Corn makes it unnaturally acidic, however, causing a kind of bovine heartburn, which in some cases can kill the animal but usually just makes it sick. Acidotic animals go off their feed, pant and salivate excessively, paw at their bellies and eat dirt. The condition can lead to diarrhea, ulcers, bloat, liver disease and a general weakening of the immune system that leaves the animal vulnerable to everything from pneumonia to feedlot polio." All this is not only unnatural and dangerous for the cows. It also has profound consequences for us. Feedlot beef as we know it today would be impossible if it weren't for the routine and continual feeding of antibiotics to these animals. This leads directly and inexorably to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. These are the new "superbugs" that are increasingly rendering our "miracle drugs" ineffective.
As well, it is the commercial meat industry's practice of keeping cattle in feedlots and feeding them grain that is responsible for the heightened prevalence of E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria. When cattle are grainfed, their intestinal tracts become far more acidic, which favors the growth of pathogenic E. coli bacteria, which in turn kills people who eat undercooked hamburger.
E. coli 0157:H7 has only recently appeared on the scene. First isolated in the 1980s, this pathogen is now found in the intestines of most U.S. feedlot cattle. The practice of feeding corn and other grains to cattle has created the perfect conditions for microbes to come into being that can harm and kill us. As Michael Pollan explains: "Most of the microbes that reside in the gut of a cow and find their way into our food get killed off by the acids in our stomachs, since they originally adapted to live in a neutral-pH environment. But the digestive tract of the modern feedlot cow is closer in acidity to our own, and in this new, manmade environment acid-resistant strains of E. coli have developed that can survive our stomach acids - and go on to kill us. By acidifying a cow's gut with corn, we have broken down one of our food chain's barriers to infections."
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On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 22:09:37 -0800, "Ted Mittelstaedt"

Obviously NOT a corn farmer. Corn is an EXTREMELY nitrogen hungry plant, and the major source of nitrogen fertilizer consumes HUGE amounts of petroleum, generally in the form of Natural Gas.
Corn is possibly THE most energy intensive crop in North America

No, it would not hurt us. But when the world price of corn, like oil, soars, the effect on countries that depend on corn for their very basic life food suffer VERY MUCH.
Corn is the staple food in an extremely large part of the world including much of Latin America and the vast majority of southern Africa. ANd not as Twinkies, soda-pop or sugar-frosted corn pops.
And TRUST ME, with the (totally lacking) mentality of the World Bank and the IMF, there will be many countries that can produce corn at a lower cost on the world market than the USA - and they will be FORCED to cash-crop to satisfy the bankers, leaving no corn for food, and leaving acres of US cornland fallow because the American farmer cannot compete. (just look at Soy Beans and Canola and other oil crops)

If it was produced from legumes and saw-grass and other low energy intensive non-food sources as well as the celulose waste from food production and consumer waste, Ethanol would make economic sense as well as being "politically correct" and ethically positive.

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