New F150's

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What I said in my post was a larger wheel with a larger tire. The fact is contrary to the poster observation, no stock Ranger in any configuration, is
the ground clearance lower than an F150 of a similar type, period.
mike

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I think you need to reword this statement. Are you trying to say No Stock Ranger in any configuration has greater ground clearance that any F150 of a similar type? And by similar type do you mean any 4x4 Ranger compared to any 4x4 F150? Are you sure this is supported by the facts?
You might want to review the data at https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/2007/bb_pdf/99.pdf and https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/2007/bb_pdf/79.pdf / https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/2007/bb_pdf/80.pdf and verify you are making a true statement. At least this time, you are mostly correct if you take a very narrow definition of what "similar type" means.
The Ranger with the greatest ground clearance (4x4 FX4 Level II Package with 31x10.50R-15SL Tires) has a minimum ground clearance of 8.3 inches. An F-150 Regular Cab 4x4 Styleside with P235/75R-17A/T Tires also has a ground clearance of 8.3". An F-150 Regular Cab 4x4 Styleside with P255/70R-17A/T Tires has a ground clearance of 8.2" So if you are comparing any Ranger 4x4 to any F150 4x4, the Ranger may have more ground clearance. A Ranger 4x4 without the FX4 Stage II package has 7.8" of clearance (less with a 4.0L) - which is less that a standard F150 4X4 with P235/75R-17A/T Tires. There are other F150 tire/wheel options that have greater ground clearance. To be clear, I am measuring ground clearance to the bottom of the rear differential. You will need to subtract the "K" dimension (the differential CL to bottom of the differential dimension) from CC dimension (the rear axle centerline height) to calculate this value. For the Ranger FX4 Stage II you need to refer to the tire data sheet to get the "CC" value for the tires on this model and use 5.7" for the "K" value since the FX4 Stage II package gets the larger differential. The standard Ranger differential hangs down 0.7 inches less than the standard F150 differential. So even though the radius of the F150 tire is greater than for the Ranger tires - 14.1" vs 12.9", the actual difference in ground clearance is less, 8.3" vs 7.8" (unless you have a 4.0 Ranger, then the differential is the same as for an F150 and the ground clearance is further reduced - unless you get the larger tires in the FX4 Stage II package).
BTW, the factory F150 with the greatest ground clearance uses the optional LT275/65R18C wheel/tire combination.
Ed
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The cross members in the new F150's on all the F150's at work are all beat in and bent back from bottoming out. I have driven these trucks, and they would barley clear a soda can sitting upright on a flat surface...
The ranger's at work are much higher... much to my surprise... and i am NOT an fan of rangers...
I am talking about 2wd trucks here, rangers w/ 235/75/15 and F150's with 255/70/17's
Ranger has more clearance, and i'm not talking about the rearend... the F150's are hitting on the front crossmember. Do you want pictures?
C. E. White wrote:

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Mike Hunter wrote:

Yes I do.
Now hte 4x4 F150 / Ranger comparison might be a different story.
I'm just saying, you measure a 2wd F150 & Ranger, i'm not talking about the rear end either mike... im talking about the front cross member... in front of the oil pan, on the F150s is very low.
I will measure them someday when i get them on a flat floor.
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