PA gas good, NY gas bad

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What is the difference between PA and NY's gasoline additives? In my '98 Escort SW,
Gas bought in PA -> 35.0mpg, $3.029/gal Gas bought in NY -> 28.5mpg, $3.259/gal
In PA, $0.0865/mile In NY, $0.1144/mile
Is PA still using MTBE? (NY has ethanol). Using NY gas, I have not broken the 30mpg mark on this vehicle since last winter. When I go west for something, I consistently get >30mpg on "foreign" gas, and it's cheaper too.
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Perhaps the increase in mileage is because when one travels WEST the earth is moving EAST? ;)
mike hunt

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Mike Hunter wrote:

;)
In summary: I hate greenies.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My vehicles work the other way; when traveling WEST, fuel mileage is LOWER, but when traveling EAST, fuel mileage is HIGHER. I think that prevailing wind direction may have something to do with it.
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Sharon K. Cooke wrote:

It's not the travel direction. These mileages are not observed on the highway going to and from PA; they are seen in random commute travel (my normal commute). It's a quantitative difference in the fuel blend.
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I get better mileage traveling south, than when I come back north. I believe is because south is ALL down hill from Delaware ;)
mike hunt

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Why, are you traveling in a plane? ;)
mike hunt
wrote:

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Mike Hunter wrote:

What does relative air speed (which affects forward resistance) have to do with being in the ground or in the air? OIC now, it's humor! Ha, ha!

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An air speed the will hardly slow a car on the ground, can stop all ground speed for a small aircraft. ;)
mike hunt

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Mike Hunter wrote:

I can't believe I'm being suckered in to this... but you're kidding, right?
I always get better MPG going east than west, for no other reason than prevailing wind.
And this is in a ground-based Taurus, 4 wheels, the typical unit.
Rob

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trainfan1 wrote:

No, think about it. The airplane is designed with a maximum _airspeed_ at a given altitude. When it's in a headwind,
a) the ambient pressure is lower (Bernoulli...), as if the plane was in still air at a higher altitude.
b) the airspeed to groundspeed relationship is different. If you're traveling at 100mph (ASI and yes I know it should be in knots), in a 30mph headwind, your ground speed is only 70mph.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Oh, that part is right for sure - I'm talking about the effect of wind on automotive fuel economy. The car has to overcome a headwind with more power & fuel consumption.
Hunt said "An air speed the will hardly slow a car on the ground, can stop all ground speed for a small aircraft."
Wind sure did slow down my Aerostar, esp. with a Christmas tree on the roof. Cruise kept kicking out w/ the loss of speed. My father-in-law won't drive his Dodge pickup on the interstate with cruise on in a stiff headwind because of all the crazy shifting down & up it does.
Rob
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Are you sure your father-in-law is not encountering hills or mountains? I thought you said you drove a Taurus? Why would you have a Christmas tree on your Aerostar, going in both directions anyway?
mike hunt
wrote:

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Mike Hunter wrote:

I'm certain he is... same route though - house to farm - wind vs. no wind comparison.
I

Sure do.

Never said I did. Again, same route, tree vs. no tree. Fuel computer on the Eddie Bauer Aerostar confirmed addl. fuel usage.
Rob

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But when going west the earth is moving backwards under you at thousands of miles per hour. ;)
mike hunt

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Mike Hunter wrote:

Not talking about slowing the vehicle at all. We're talking about the additional power (and therefore, additional fuel) required to overcome the added air resistance that a vehicle encounters when traveling into the wind. I had a weekly commute between KC & StL for about three years and kept very close fuel & maintenance records. My one-way runs to StL averaged 31.9 mpg over the three years, and StL to KC was 28.1 mpg for the same three years. This was all I-70 traffic, with cruise set at 70 mph, and it didn't matter where I got fuel. What DID matter was the effective air speed of the vehicle - yes, it was still on the ground, but it still had an air speed, or if you prefer, a definitive forward speed as would be measured by a pitot tube device. Traveling at 70 mph on the ground with a 15 mph average wind from the West toward the East, the "air speed" of the vehicle was (70-15) 55 mph, but traveling the other way, same wind speed and direction, the "air speed" of the vehicle was (70+15) 85 mph. There are of course other factors such as rolling resistance of the tires, but I always kept them on the high side of the psi recommendations, so that wouldn't amount to anything that was a variable. OK, you can go back to talking about your airplanes again. :)

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What about the fact you Taurus has a lager frontal area than the rear area? Beside with all of the curves in a road you are not always going directly east or west. What about hills they are never always the same going east and west ;)
mike hunt

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Are you in college or a graduate?
mike hunt

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It seem to me your parents or the government or both wasted a lot of money. LOL
mike hunt

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wrote:

If you're going to Pennsylvania from NYC, then you are going uphill. When you go East from PA to NYC, you are going downhill.
Could that have something to do with it?
Jeff
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