Pressure senders and gauges

What are the differences between electric senders for oil pressure and fuel pressure ? The real question being, if i had a oil pressure sender and suitable
gage, could it just as easily be used as a fuel pressure sender? Granted, the gauge range would have the match the fuel pressure range. But, are the senders any different from oil to fuel pressure? (other than the range of readings)
So assuming one could securely plub a oil pressure gauge into a fuel manifold, could it be used as a testing method? With a gauge in the passenger compartment, to be used as a temporary test for fuel pressure drop to trouble shoot for engine problems?
Yea, i know i could probably buy a whole electric sender fuel pressure set-up, but i am trying to keep this probable one use test set-up low in cost. The junk senders and gauges could be had cheaply. And the fun of cobbling it all together would be priceless.
BOB
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On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 13:55:56 -0700, BOB URZ

The sender is calibrated to the gauge it is serving, so it's unlikely the readings would be accurate.

It would be unprofessional and unsafe to run the fuel gauge in the passenger compartment. Most racers put them on the engine or on the cowl.
Why not just use a standard pressure gauge for testing?

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saeengineer opined in

W-W-HAT?!!!!!
Get your Attention Deficit in order here, bub. Tell us WHY it would be unsafe? Hint: Subject of the thread.

As an ENGINEER but NOT SAE or mechanical but also a guy who has seen a few oil senders spring leaks... I'd say Okay. NOT permanent... or ShurzHell - eventually you will Fiero.
It'll only be good for looking at "delta" of course.
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saeengineer wrote:

Accuracy is not my concern. It the change off of the normal value. Once i establish what the nominal value is. When i have my intermittent condition, i need to see if the pressure is dropping.

You did not read my post very closely. I said ELECTRIC sender. not MECHANICAL gauge. (remote reading, no piping of gas) Therefore, any gauge in the passenger compartment would be electric, and there would be no chance of fuel leakage in the passenger compartment (which would NOT be good) This would be a temporary set up anyway. Just for testing purposes. I have a intermittent condition which maybe be fuel pressure related. I don't want to have to stop the Truck and pop the hood to look at a mechanical gauge when it happening..

I don't own a high pressure gauge for FI systems at this time. Its on my list though. If i were shrewd, i could temporarily disconnect the oil pressure senders feed wire and replace it with the temporary fuel pressure sender and use the dash OP gauge for read out. It reads up to 80 PSI or so. It Should be in the ballpark for readings That's assuming i could plub the sender in. And i get a second sender that's close to my current oil pressure sender in function At this
point, i am still studying if that's feasible in my S10.
BOB

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On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 19:45:00 -0500, BOB URZ

I still don't understand why accuracy is not a concern. If for example your standard cruise reading was 10 psi and during problem X it was 9 psi. since the sender and gauge are not calibrated to each other, you would have no reference point as to what that meant. It seems that you are trying to make a complex solution for a simple problem.

You are correct. I actually did not read it incorrectly. I interpreted it incorrectly. I was incorrect in understanding what you meant (which is what you said :)).

You don't have to pop open the hood. That was my point. Technicians have been tapping fuel gauges to windshields for dynamic fuel pressure testing for at least 20 years. This was the point of saying,

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No difference at all in function. There are several types. Some use a diaphragm that moves a potentiometer. Some are piezoelectric. So to answer your question, yes. Most gauges and senders for an "oil system" goes up to at least 80 psi, it will most certainly work for an automobile fuel system. Under normal conditions the average fuel system operates at a max of 40 psi. Yes the pump can provide enough flow to have system pressures of up to and above 80 psi, but that is with a fully plugged return line. It's measuring pressure, nothing else.

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Mark Keith wrote:

I never thought of using a A/C gauge. Very original idea. But you could never use it for A/C uses again due to contamination. I only have one right now, but i periodically run across some older beat up ones cheap. Maybe the next garage sales i will pick one up. What is the female fitting called that screws on the end of the shrader valve and depresses it?
BOB
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It costs only $30 to get a fuel pressure gauge from Pep Boys that will do the job for you. By the time you muck around trying to get a used gauge set and adapt the AC hose connection to the Shraeder valve, you'll be better off with the correct tool. I love to save a buck too, but get the right tool and you'll have it forever. Stan K.
BOB URZ wrote:

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