Ranger fuel gauage

91 ranger 4 cyl
Gauge suddenly quit. Reads empty. Haven't crawled underneath yet to look for obvious. Did check the fuse panel but found no blown fuses. I don't know
which circuit this would be on. This vehicle is like new with only 114K on it. Anyone have a wiring diagram? Should be simple enough I expect though would just like a glimpse of what's there.
TIA
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labatyd wrote:

trouble shooting section.
Your going to have to drop the tank and id the tank wire. If i were to guess, i would say corroded gauge wire at the tank, bad ground at the tank, or bad sender.
Once you find the wire, you could insert a resistor in place of the sender and see if the gauge reads to test. If you have some resistors, try ground, 10 ohms, 50 ohms, 100 ohms and see what the gauge reads. (all referenced to ground)
If trying this does not help, you might have a bad wire to the cluster or bad cluster gauge.
good luck.
bob
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If it is a short bed Ranger, pulling the bed might actually be easier than dropping the tank.
Ed
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On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 12:43:28 -0400, "Ed White" wrote:

And as always, look for a bolted service hatch in the bed, the trunk, or under the back seat (as applicable to various vehicles) to get to the fuel pump and fuel sender without dropping the tank. Sometimes they think ahead, sometimes they don't...
If they didn't install a hatch, it is a selfish financial move by the car maker, because most of the time the vehicle is long out of warranty by the time the fuel pump or gauge becomes a problem.
The car maker could care less how much the repair will cost you, they only worry about how much it will cost THEM.
--<< Bruce >>--
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message wrote...

There is no hatch. But a Ranger bed is easy to remove (done it personally, by myself). An F150 bed is little harder because of the weight. When the fuel pump check valve started leaking on my 12 year old F150, the shop I took it to initially planned to drop the tank, but after working under the truck for a few minutes, they decided pulling the bed was easier (I tried to tell them this in the first place). 20 minutes later the bed was off, and replacing the fuel pump was a breeze.
As for auto manufacturers not caring about what it costs you - if costs them more to build a vehicle, it will cost you more to buy it. Not counting VWs, in the last 30 years we have had to replace only one fuel pump (and even then the fuel pump itself was not bad - just the check valve which made for hard starting at times). Manufacturers are most interested in pleasing the people who buy cars from them, not the people who buy 15 year old used vehicles off a lot. If the dealer told you a new car was going to cost $1000 more so that Billy Bob will find it easier to work on in 15 years, would you think it was a good deal?
Ed
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message wrote...

There is no hatch. But a Ranger bed is easy to remove (done it personally, by myself). An F150 bed is little harder because of the weight. When the fuel pump check valve started leaking on my 12 year old F150, the shop I took it to initially planned to drop the tank, but after working under the truck for a few minutes, they decided pulling the bed was easier (I tried to tell them this in the first place). 20 minutes later the bed was off, and replacing the fuel pump was a breeze.
As for auto manufacturers not caring about what it costs you - if costs them more to build a vehicle, it will cost you more to buy it. Not counting VWs, in the last 30 years we have had to replace only one fuel pump (and even then the fuel pump itself was not bad - just the check valve which made for hard starting at times). Manufacturers are most interested in pleasing the people who buy cars from them, not the people who buy 15 year old used vehicles off a lot. If the dealer told you a new car was going to cost $1000 more so that Billy Bob will find it easier to work on in 15 years, would you think it was a good deal?
Ed
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