Re: 1987 Ford Aerostar Woes - Need Help, Please

River Run opined in


I have no experience with using Carb Cleaner first-hand, and I am NOT sure what effect it would have...I AM Pretty sure it would mess up the TPS if doused liberally.
But I know that EVERYONE says DONT USE CARB CLEANER on throttle bodies!
AS you are posting from Google, too bad you didnt search on it FIRST.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thomas Moats opined in

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
River Run opined

Odd... having been around them for 45 years.... my impression is just the opposite. LOTS of people drive their cars for 200 K Miles, now... 35 years ago they were done at about 120.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dunno, I think it's all up to the upkeep. My 68 F-250 went 170k on it's first engine, and it was abused like a lost stepchild in it's later years. "I got it near the end of the engines life" It's still got the original gear box and rear end. I've got a rebuilt engine in it with about 3100 miles on it. With me taking care of this new engine from day one, I fully expect to get 200k if I keep it that long, and the rebuilder didn't chinch out on his part. It's running good so far. All my cars last a long time. No matter what brand or age. I keep them up, and I don't hot rod them. That 68 truck could easily go another 35 years no sweat at all. It's like a tank being a 3/4 ton, and quite reliable too. The only problem is every once in a while , weird little parts will break, and they are getting harder to find. IE: I had to replace my brake pedal assbly a while back. Not many junk yards have that old stuff anymore. But I did get lucky and find one. And he had three to pick from...You do have to do maintenance more often on the old vehicles. That goes with the territory...I do get to skip those pesky smog checks, being it's over 25 years old. :) MK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (River Run) wrote in message

If you have a car that is really carboned up bad, the store cleaners won't usually get it all in one shot. Not strong enough for a bad case. If this started after you started the injector cleaner, it's quite possible that you are severely carboned up, and the cleaner is clogging the injectors. It's slowly cutting the crud, but it gums the injector tips as the gunk cools. "My theory anyway.." It's also possible you may be having intake valve problems due to the carbon. The cleaners you buy at the store work in general, but you have to use the right method. #1...Most of the deposits on the injectors are caused by additives gumming up during hot soak periods. This is when you cut the engine off, and it sits when hot. The cleaners work in the same way. They only do any good during hot soaks. They do very little if anything when actually driving the car. So to take full advantage of the stuff, you have to get the car hot, and then let it sit, over and over and over again. I had to do this on a 92 camry last summer. But in my case, I helped it along. I ran a carb cleaner/injector cleaner/ATF mix straight into the throttle body vacuum port before shutting it down to heat soak. This helped soak the carbon on the intake valves. It took nearly a week to finally get it clean. That car was BAD. Carbon was snowconed behind the valves. If you have a real bad case, it's much faster to use solvent and quickly clean the injectors. Even better, find a shop with a "Motorvac" machine. Carbon is a real PIA on these new EFI cars for some reason. BTW, if you can finally get it clean, I do recommend using cleaner every few tanks or so. Also, try to stick to good gas. Preferably chevron as it has some techron in it. MK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The throttle positioning sensor I never went near. It's on the outside of the throttle body.

I have heard this too. See below.

I got this info from a factory trained technician. He has been repairing autos for over 25 years. He also teaches students and they work on these vans all the time. In fact, when I was talking with him, they had an Aerostar in the shop and it was undergoing the same proceedure, as well as a tune up.
Thanks for your help. Just going to read your next post.
rr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.