Re: Ford Fusion reverse gear

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The Passat has some very good points, but it is clearly not designed with any thought to repair. To do even routine work in the engine compartment requires extensive dissasembly.

The problem is that his notion of quality is probably not the same as my notion of quality. I can live with readily-repaired defects that he might not consider acceptable, and I'm extremely frustrated by the sort of repair procedures that he probably considers reasonable. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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Some of the biggest complaints I heard about were electrical system problems. If there were one focusable electrical unit problem, that might be more easily fixed. When the problem is spread over a "system", you may never get everything fixed and working correctly.
It is, IMO, a matter of taking responsibility for citruslike product...maybe not total lemons approaching them. GM never did very well at this either, until their ox was in the ditch.
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This is increasingly becoming a problem for ALL car manufacturers. The complexity of the electrical systems is increasing exponentially, and the knowledge of the dealer mechanics is not increasing at the same rate. On top of that, most of this stuff is designed to be replaced in large expensive modules, in order to make troubleshooting easier. This means even minor repairs become expensive, and even worse it means that board-swapping "changineers" can very rapidly turn a minor problem into an enormous expense.

Hell, look at Mercedes...... and don't even get me started on the newer BMW electronics... --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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One can say that about any make/model car. They're called "lemons". My personal experience with VWs is before the mid-90s, they were by and large dependable at the very least.

VW quality control went when they went fishing for the bigger market almost a decade ago .

Maybe I won't have to. The rate I'm going, it'll be 12 years until I hit 100K miles. By then, my detached garage roof will be covered with solar cells and the garage will house a Ford electric plug-in.
--
Dave



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On Tue, 30 Jun 2009 05:30:59 -0500, Dioclese wrote:

I was talking to a guy I know today who bought a GMC p/u from me when I used to sell used cars. 100,000 miles and one tranny later, the thing is still going. He loads about 3 tons of scrap in it regularly to bring to the recycler's.
I said to him, pointing to my Scion, "Toyota occasionally makes a lemon, GM ocassionally makes a good one..."
Generalization, but GM would be in better shape if their paradigm more closely matched Toyota's...

Actually, the Rabbit was kind of hit or miss, too. For every 3 good ones there was one really horrible copy.

My tC is a 2005 with 26,000 miles. I'll get there sooner, but not by much...
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May Ford Focus has been flawless so far, with about 13,000 mi on it.
Evidence that Ford Foci have more problems than other cars, please.
Jeff
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Jeff wrote:

Wow, 13,000 miles and nary a problem yet? That's amazing! You'll have to accept anecdotal evidence (shouldn't be a problem since you freely offer the same), but I see virtually every Focus nickel and dime their customers pretty badly, and a good number cause enough expensive problems to total the car (as they lose value very quickly that isn't too hard). It's tough to sell anything as their customers don't spend any money anyway. As I said in an earlier post, I think the Focus is actually a bit better in reliability and cost of ownership than most other Ford products, but that isn't saying much.
--
Toyota MDT in MO

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Is that why Ford is out selling Toyota and besting Toyota in many of the customer surveys?
Take a look at what vehicles the currier fleets are buying. Currier car are run 24 hours, a days seven days a week, and easily run to 100,000 miles or more a year and they are not buying Toyotas. When the do choose a foreign car over Fords, they buy Korean cars. LOL
wrote:

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He has a point, but his hat hides it.
--
Tegger


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Tegger wrote:

Ah, very good explanation!
--
Toyota MDT in MO

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I've opened two G5M's, and see no evidence to support synchronized reverse. Further proof is when you try to go into reverse immediately after pressing the clutch without letting the input shaft spin down. It grinds. Both of my G5M's did it. The FSM I have says it's got a sync'd reverse. I don't believe it. If you look at how the linkage works, there is a straight-cut gear that flips upward to link the input and output shafts and reverse the direction of the output in the process of doing so. There is no syncronizer on the reverse fork that I can see.
As far as the symptom that the OP is mentioning, it sounds like something went casters-up in the linkage inside the box. Might be easier to find a good used junkyard transaxle and put that into the car and fix the one you have as time permits. At only 30k the bearings and syncronizers -should- be in perfect shape, so the repair might be as simple as replacing one or two hard parts and resealing the case halves. The fact that the forward gears are still working is a very good sign. The G5M isn't terribly hard to take apart, I did mine with a a few sockets and a hammer and punch to remove the roll pin from the 5th gear fork. Before you get too far into the repair just remember that the differential side gears in the G5M's I've worked on are not self-supporting. You -must- put a PVC pipe or wooden dowel in the hole for the CV axle once you pull the first axle out, or you will get to re-align the differential gears. Ask me how I know...I got a 2,000 mile mint used example shipped to me, sans supports for the differential gears, and had to open the box to fix it.
Chris
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Hal wrote:

Yup, on many transaxles the norm is to do away with any machined hub on the back of the side gears (probably saves a penny), so it is always wise to secure any unfamiliar differential side gear with a suitable pipe or what-have-you during axle removal. Bet you're an expert on that gearbox now, huh?! :-)
--
Toyota MDT in MO

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