Re: RADAR WRONG again! Worth fighting for!

The easiest way to beat radar tickets is to install a whip radio receiver antenna. When you get stopped for doing 65 in a 45 zone, tell the officer
you were going only 45, not the 65 he says you were going. He'll ask you if you are calling him a "liar?" Answer, "Of course not officer. But your radar gun is lying to you. You see, my radio antenna whips around in the breeze and adds 15 mph to my real speed."
The above is guaranteed to work because cops are stupid.
If you get a radar ticket, go to court on it. The judge will say you can't beat it, but you can show him how stupid he is. Just supoena the cop, his radar and bring in your whip antenna. Stand 10 feet in front of the cop and with his radar turned on, you should be able to whip yourself up to about 50 mph right in the courtroom. Case dismissed.
Sometimes, though, you joke your way out of a ticket, so try this: When the officer stops you for speeding, tell him, "Yes, officer, I was speeding alright. BUT NOT OVERSPEEDING! Speeding is normal, but overspeeding is what causes accidents." He'll think you're a riot because he's never heard that one before and let you off with a warning.
We live in a new age of police state activity directed towards innocent motorists. Statistics show there is a 1 in 80 chance of dying in an auto crash. Since in 50% of the cases, its your fault (either its your fault or not, therefore 50:50), there is a 1 chance in 160 you will cause a fatal in your lifetime. But here's the rub: An accident used to be labeled as such, just an accident and the matter was up to the civil courts, usually. Not anymore. If you cause a fatal you will be up for manslaughter or vehicular homicide or worse (murder). Doesn't this society suck?
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