Re: US car dealers turn away Canadian new-car buyers - is that legal?

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How do you reach that conclusion?
Obviously anyone with a CDN address is discriminated against. The car companies are really showing their greed on this issue.
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who wrote:

There was a couple on the news who went to maine from canada to visit family or whatnot ... tried to buy a new car and the dealer prohibited them from doing so. they are taking the dealer to court (Hope they have deep pockets).
I wish more people would do this.
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Finding someone with a US address to buy the car could be an upcoming business opportunity. Some people have friends/family that can buy and then sell as a used car to their Canadian relatives. I don't know why the salesmen wouldn't offer this service to anyone who wants to buy a car in the US.
How do those companies that buy cars for people work? Do they buy the car and then turn it over to you, or do they just get your name on the original purchase?
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Finding someone with a US address to buy the car could be an upcoming

Dealership, if they are smart enough to squeeze the juice out of the fruit, they can always open a seperate entity just to buy cars and do resale buiness with canadians. However, becuz canadian cross border buyers are still not common, and used car really depreciate alot, there is big risk for them to take.
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You are likely referring to this:

You can join them and help out their pockets. Actually the USA Gov. should back the suit.
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It's a class action suit. They won't see diddly-squat for money.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

1. an act or instance of discriminating. 2. treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit: racial and religious intolerance and discrimination. 3. the power of making fine distinctions; discriminating judgment: She chose the colors with great discrimination. 4. Archaic. something that serves to differentiate.
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Picasso wrote:

What's your point?
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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Bill Putney wrote:

OK - since he's not going to answer the question, does anyone know what his point was?
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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"Bruce L. Bergman" wrote:

Such rules do not prohibit or hinder a transaction between a prospective Canadian customer and a US new car dealer.

The Canadian gov't publishes guides explaining how it's citizens can import a wide variety of items from the US into Canada. The Canadian gov't does not have the same level of "paranoia" regarding the tracking or reporting of the movements of assets owned by Canadians outside of Canada (or inside for that matter). The only requirement along those lines is that Canadians must report if they own more than $100k of non-Canadian real estate. Many Canadians own US real estate, and vice-versa.

Are there state or local laws that prevent US car dealers from selling NEW vehicles to Canadians?
The sale of USED vehicles to Canadians happens all the time. So do US state or local laws differentiate between new and used vehicles - or (as I suspect) are there NO such state or local rules prohibiting sale based on Canadian residency?

That is a technicallity that is NOT used as the basis for denial of sale of NEW vehicles to Canadians.

The franchise agreements can not contain illegal clauses that constitute restraint of trade. If they do, they can (and should) be challenged by the dealers.
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My Name Is Nobody wrote:

A Canadian would almost certainly have to pay in "cash" or equivalent (bank draft, cashiers check, etc) if they were to purchase a new vehicle from a US dealer.
But as has been stated here MANY TIMES, US dealers are refusing the sale, on the grounds that their franchise agreements do not allow them to sell to Canadians - even if the transaction happens 100% within the dealer's showroom and the dealer is in no way involved in transporting the vehicle into Canada.
(FYI - Currently, 1.00 Canadian dollar is equal to almost 1.03 US dollars).
There are absolutely NO restrictions placed on Canadians by any level of Canadian gov't that prohibits Canadians from purchasing US vehicles (new or used) and bringing them back to Canada and licensing them for use in Canada. The Canadian gov't publishes pamphlets and guides explaining the process. There are also no US gov't (or state or local) restrictions that prohibits Canadians from purchasing new or used vehicles from any level of US vendor (dealer, private owner, etc) and exporting the vehicle back to Canada.
There are laws in the US (restraint of trade) that prohibits contracts between parties that convey no benefit to either party. A clause in a dealer franchise that specifies a condition where a sale can not be made is an example of a contract that conveys no benefit to either the dealer or the manufacturer and technically violates US restraint of trade laws.
"Contractual obligations not to trade are illegal agreements on public policy grounds unless they are reasonable in the interests of both contracting parties and of the public at large."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restraint_of_trade
An agreement between a manufacturer and a dealer that specifies that a dealer can not do business with a subset of prospective customers is an example of "restraint of trade" and conveys no benefit to either the dealer or the public.
And such an agreement does not benefit the auto manufacturer in question because auto makers operate separate US and Canadian companies, hence an entity like Ford USA does not benefit by placing restrictions on US dealers to sell only to US residents (irregardless of the fact that Ford Canada may benefit from such a restriction).
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MoPar Man wrote:

Read Wes's reply - that is an example. There are many other examples in everyday life - some that shouldn't be, and many that are based on politics. For example - so-called affirmative action laws trump anti-discrimination laws. There might be a law that says I can't fire a weapon within town limits that might get trumped if I am forced to to save my or someone elses life. Almost infinite examples.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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