Re: Windstar 3.8l engine

It seems all the makers are selling us bum engines. Some GM engines will suddenly leak coolant through defective intake manifolds. All the Japanese makers use timing belts with non-free running crankshafts - a disaster
waiting to happen. The list goes on and on.
Continental, Lycoming and Pratt & Whitney don't seem to have any problems with their engines. Maybe car makers should contract out their engine design and production to them to finally put an end to auto engine problems. Of course, the Government will have to "certify" them to ensure no short cuts are taken by these reputable engine makers as a result of cost-cutting pressure by Detroit Iron.
Within one human lifetime, we have seen cars go from $2000 to $20,000 and more, yet we hear the same old excuses: every nickel counts; it costs too much to build no-compromise automobiles. Now we know no-compromise is the only answer to domestic car makers' survival; anything less is ripoff and the customer base has finally realized it.
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On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 23:06:03 +0200 (CEST), George Orwell

Not all, and not just Japanese. American too.

When's the last time you owned one? Ever heard of ADs? Airworthiness directives. You fix it or you don't fly it - doesn't matter if yours is having a problem or not. And it's YOUR dollar, no matter the age. If you had to drive behind a LycoSaurus we' hear you bitching from coast to coast without a megaphone!!

And what's an O200 Lycoming engine worth? 200 cubic inches, aprox 80 HP and $40,000 for the engine alone.

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George Orwell wrote:

Not if you change the belts. BTW, the camshafts are free-running. The valves are another story.

make about 75 HP. Not enough for cars today.

And are very expensive and require tons of maintaince for their engines, as required by the FAA. I would prefer my car engine to break down than the engine in the airplane I am flying in.

Gee, so you want them good and cheap. Sorry, it doesn't work that way.

How much have cars increased in price when considering inflation?
How about when considering the improvements? Cars today last 300,000+ km. How far did they go 30 years ago? 150,000 km if you were lucky. Factor that in now.
Jeff

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bum engines? So you finally took our advice when we kept telling you to shove it up your ass?
Ted
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happen. The list goes on and on.

I am building an airplane and have an informed amatuers knowledge of the airchraft engines. Generally speaking, they are quite simple engines with few of the bell's and whistles that you find in auto engines. They rely on large displacements for their horsepower as opposed to high RPM. This helps them last longer.
I noticed another person commented about airworthiness directives. If a problem is found, the government mandates that it be fixed, further, the fix must be applied by a licensed mechanic. In fact, all repairs to the powerplant and airframe must be performed by a licensed mechanic and he/she is required to sign off on the repairs. The government also requires periodic (annual) inspections). If the plane falls out fo the sky, the government comes back to the mechanic. I believe this all results in a generally high level of repairs and maintenance.
Still, an aircraft engine is considered run out at a little over 2,000 hours. Given the cost of new engines, they are generally completely inspected and rebuilt at that point. Granted, they would last longer and this is largely a safety point. If you consider an average speed of 40 mph for a car, 100,000 miles translates to 2,500 hours of driving. I generally drive my cars for twice that and only once have had to do a rebuild. I know its not a one to one comparison but still, the point is that car engines are pretty reliable.
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There's no replacement for displacement!!!
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