Recurring Problem With Air Conditioning

Hello All,
I have a ten year old Taurus. The first seven years the AC was like new, but after that I've had repair done for the last three summers
(leak sealing procedure and cooling agent replaced). It's happening again this summer. I used it three or four times and it's only slightly cool.
What can be done? Can this AC be restored to new? Is it normal to need repair every summer?
Joek In Jersey
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Joek wrote:

It will keep happening until you actually make the repair. The "leak sealing procedure" is less than a band-aid - it will never "heal".
On the Taurus, the "Condensor-to-Evaporator Tube" is the usual suspect, especially when you can't easily find the leak. It runs along the right side frame rail in the engine compartment, covered in a foam insulator tube.
Rob
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Depends on what the "leak sealing procedure" was. If the crankshaft bearings in the AC compressor are shot and wobbling, or the shaft is scored where it goes through the seal and it leaks even with the seal replaced, it's time for a remanufactured compressor.
All the components and hoses are replaceable, it's in the labor needed to correctly identify the problem part(s) and replace them - without breaking something else.
The only place that sealants can be used is on the joints between lines and hoses (LineLock sealant, works like Permatex #2) and that's only a palliative - you're supposed to replace or re-anneal the soft copper gaskets, or change out the line that has a cracked/scratched flare sealing surface.
Sealant compounds that go in the refrigerant (like Bar's Leak in the radiator) can't work - they would clog the small channels in the metering orifice (or expansion valve) that would look just like a big leak to anything floating through. Or get caught in the filter/drier filter media.
You have to be Very Careful with the fittings on the refrigerant lines and the cores, if you don't use two flare-nut wrenches correctly the aluminum tubing twists and it's all over. Aluminum will develop fatigue cracks when bent and Pssssssss...
The evaporator core is the one killer component - it's in the heater box, and in most Fords you practically have to dismantle the entire dashboard and interior of the car to change them. If you have to do that get a new heater core installed at the same time, because Murphy's Law says next year it springs a leak.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Does this seem to be more of an issue since the change from R12 to R134? I never has A/C problems in the past like I do now.
wrote:

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The only reason it may be more prevalent is that R-134a normal operating pressures are much higher than R-12. I don't have the charts handy, but from memory it's something like a jump from 180 PSI on the high-side of an R-12 system to 300+ PSI for R-134a.
That, and they may be trying to use the same thickness of aluminum tubing for the cores and connecting lines of newer cars (or even shaving a few thou off the wall thickness to save weight and money) even with the higher running pressures. Which would make them a bit more likely to develop little porosity leaks and/or fatigue cracks and big leaks.
Haven't stopped to research it, though.
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wrote:

Obviously my observation is completely anecdotal. But it does seem like leaks and corrosion are more frequent.
mg
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MG wrote:

No, it's been more of an issue since Ford introduced Spring Lock couplers for the AC lines. I see they are moving away from them in recent years.
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well, since a 10 year old taurus came from the factory with R134-A refrigerant, there would be no issue to deal with unless for some unknown stupid reason someone converted it to R12
wrote:

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