Refrigerant

I have an 87 BronchoII and I'm trying to find the low-pressure port. My AC doesn't get cold so I'm thinking it needs refrigerant, however I'm lost in
all the hoses and wires. HELP!
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AC doesn't get cold so I'm thinking it needs refridgerant, however I'm lost >> in all the hoses and wires. HELP!
If you can find the compressor it is probably the schrader valve on the narrower of the two refrigerent lines coming out.
But don't even bother because your system is most likely an R-12 system, a Class II refridgerant which you cannot purchase on your own without an EPA certification.
If you add R-134A you will contaminate your system by mixing refridgerants, which use different oils, not to mention the recovery equipment of the poor sucker at the shop who winds up pumping the system down when it fails again.
I don't know what R12 goes for these days but for an 87 Ford it isn't worth the recovery, leak testing, parts replacement and recharge. You're looking at probably a $500 to $800 repair bill at a shop equipped to handle this job.
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Besides what sleepdog just said, those years had a problem with the "O" rings at the quick-connect fittings. They would decompose and leak. Some actually blew out making quite a noise, a puff of smoke, and spewing all that expensive R-12 out. If memory serves me, the low side valve is smaller than the high side that year... but I fear you will be wasting whatever you put in if you don't repair the "O" rings...
I think even the basic shop manuals show A/C, maybe one of those service CD's they have at AutoZone. I have seen many helpful web pages over the years, too. Google automotive A/C repair, see what you find.
Good luck.
****>>> Oh, don't open the system if you don't have a vacuum pump. As soon as air gets in (and the moisture that's in it) the system becomes contaminated. If you decide to do it, you will need to work fast and vacuum it down ASAP. Then you can refill.
PoD

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You can still buy it, but they can't make anymore or import it, so as the stocks are depleted, the price with continue to soar. My neighbor just had to have his home central air refilled due to a leak.... three times.
Older vehicles require a conversion kit. For my transAM, GM quoted about $1,000. The service manager suggested I'd be better off to pay the higher price for the R12 if it went down, and then start looking for a new car.
Newer vehicles which have the R12, "I was told", don't need the conversion parts (what the cutoff year is, I do not know).
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