Removing 1994 Ford Taurus a/c compressor

We are trying to replace the air conditioning compressor on a 1994 Ford Taurus with a 3.0L engine. We have run into issues removing the power steering and alternator bracket. The Chilton manual gives no help,
other than to state the obvious that the compressor can't be removed from below. But it does not tell how to access it from above. Does anyone have any advice as to how to remove the bracket to access the compressor? Or is there a way to remove the compressor another way?
Thanks for any help.
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hana snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Access is a problem. The bolts are long going into the AC compressor. The best way to get the PS pump off is first disconnect the hoses to the pump. You don't remove the pump directly. you leave the pulley on the pump. You remove the serp belt. remove the tensioner. then pull off the bracket for the PS pump and remove it as an assembly. You don't remove the PS pump from its mount bracket. You now have a clear shot from the top. But your still boned from the radiator. Its possible to get the pump off with the radiator in, but chances are you will bump it in the process. If your changing the compressor, you need to get a AC fitting tool and replace ALL the Orings on the hoses.
Before you do any of this, i would degrease the motor well in the area your going to be working in.
Why are you changing the compressor? is it R12 ore R134?
Bob
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First of all, thank you for your information about accessing the compressor.
In answer to your questions, it uses R134. The compressor had blown out, and after destroying a serpentine belt, the clutch pulley is out of line and seemingly broken, and it was thought best to change the whole unit after that sequence of events.
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If the compressor seized maybe you should flush out everything: Condensor, coil, liquid and suction lines. Put in a new accumulator/dryer and expansion valve.
Most places won't warranty a new compressor without changing those two parts. I'm going through the motions right now on an old 90 Escort GT. I plan on getting a robinair flush gun and some solvent or mineral spirits to clean out the components I mentioned above. Then also an R134a manifold set and vacuum pump to make sure I can pull a good vacuum, to make sure the seal is good before I charge it again.
Good luck, sleepdog
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

just a note, sleepdog... the point of pulling the deep vacuum is to get all the moisture out.
It also helps determine the seal of the system but that's secondary.
Given the sealing technology, it's not too unusual for a system to hold a vacuum forever... and still leak too much to be called fixed. The differential pressures are opposite direction.
And sometimes, a vacuum wont hold long but filling with refrig, you cant find a leak with a professional sniffer.
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I knew that! I wasn't too concerned about moisture since I'm replacing half the components and flushing the rest, but point taken it still needs to removed before charging.

I have a can of r134a dye, maybe I just need the light and glasses.
Thanks
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hana snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If your real lucky, the compressor clutch shelled and you could put a replacement clutch on your existing compressor. What was the chain of events that caused it? It will take a special tool to get the clutch assembly off. If the compressor is seized its history.
You could take a chance on a junk yard unit. Make sure its off a R134 car if you do.
I hope you got all the tools to do the job. Vacuum pump, gauges, fitting tools, clutch tools etc.
R134 has sure gone up in the last year too.
Bob
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