Removing the box, 1991 Ranger

Well, the fuel pump went in my Ranger this afternoon. Left me broke down on the side of the road, luckily I was less than 10 kms from home, so a friend
with a 1/2 ton towed the truck to my yard. The truck just quit running while on the way home, stalled out and wouldn't restart. When I listened for the fuel pump to hum while turning the key ahead, it didn't. Checked all the fuses, relays, fuel pump shutoff switch, everything looks ok. Also, the truck has 245,000 kms and the pump has never been changed to my knowledge, so I'm pretty sure it is burned out.
Anyway, changing the pump is no big deal. I've had the tank off before to change the sending unit, fortunately at that time the tank was nearly empty. My problem is this time the fuel tank is full and instead of trying to pump the fuel out and finding a large enough container to hold it in, I would rather just remove the box and change the pump with the tank still in place. But, the cheap Haynes manual I have shows absolutely nothing as far as removing the box. Is it as simple as removing the box liner, removing the box bolts, tail lights and wiring assemblies to the lights? Or is there a bit more to it than that? I know it has been discussed before and seems a much simpler way to get at the fuel tank.
Any help is appreciated, Sharky
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Sharky wrote:

and 1 wiring harness connector. Soak the clip nuts holding the bed bolts with penetrant for a couple of days before hand. Be gentle with the bolt directly above the tank. If the clip on the nut breaks you'll have to grind off the head. The other 5 can be heated with a torch to make removal easier.
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Well, after 6 hours of wrenching, I got the truck back together. Suprisingly, I managed to get the 6 box bolts out without using a torch, they all came out with a ratchet once they were broke free from the rust. When I pulled the box back, I unplugged the sending unit connector and immediately found my problem. All four terminals in the connector were green from corrosion and the power lead that runs to the fuel pump was rusted almost completely off.
To my amazement, my new neighbour, who I just met this morning and who happens to be a Heavy Equipment mechanic, had a sending unit and fuel pump out of an Aerostar that he just stacked on a shelf yesterday when they moved in. So I cut off my old connector and crimped his back in place. VOILA! Started the truck, went for a test drive and everything is well again.
All that cursing yesterday for a job that turned out to be one of the easiest repairs yet, LOL. Thanks again for the help Tom.
Sharky
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