Reparing Leak in Tire Side Wall

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I have a slow lead in the side wall that came from scraping some kind of sharp object laying by the curb. Looks like a 1/2-inch cut, but jagged. Tire is tubeless radial. Is it possible to patch something like this
on the side wall? Patch kits say they are for the tread but don't say specifically not to use them on the side.
2nd thought -- can I put a tube in it? Seems like I remember tire places say tubeless can't be fixed with a tube, but I can't see why not.
Anyway, thanks in advance for any help.
SJ
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I have a slow lead in the side wall that came from scraping some kind of sharp object laying by the curb. Looks like a 1/2-inch cut, but jagged. Tire is tubeless radial. Is it possible to patch something like this on the side wall? Patch kits say they are for the tread but don't say specifically not to use them on the side.
2nd thought -- can I put a tube in it? Seems like I remember tire places say tubeless can't be fixed with a tube, but I can't see why not.
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have done just that in the past.
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let me add: mine was a radial tire and I got many miles out of it with the tube. However the hole in the sidewall was the tiniest of holes from hitting the curb, not your 1/2" jagged fright.
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A tube should work, but any kind of cut could lead to a blow out. Especially one on the side wall. I say replace the tire.
--
Dan Espen

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On 11/4/2014 2:20 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

Yeah - Your not supposed to patch a side wall. Mostly it's due to the flexing the sidewall does, the patch won't hold long anyway but that 1/2" tear you got will end up weakening and as the previous poster mentioned, a blowout could happen. Don't ever stick a plug in the side wall either - That will spread the steel bands and weaken the wall worse. I've gotten away with having a plug stuck in on the very edge of the tread before, (but still facing the road) where your not supposed to have one, but was in a situation where I had no choice. Still fine after 30K miles there, but never would I do a sidewall. I don't see why a tube wouldn't be fine, but would patch the tire on the inside so no chance of the tube having any issues with where the cut was.
But all in all, with the price for a tube & repair why not just get a new tire? If your really hard up for $$, you can even buy used with decent tread left. I've never done it before, but have seen used tire places so someone does.. :)
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On 11/4/2014 2:45 PM, IYM wrote:

I agree. Steel is in the belt and sidewalls are probably polyester plies. If these are cut, tire would be at risk to patch as flexing is in the sidewall and any repair would probably not be permanent.
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wrote:

Strange - I've NEVER seen a radial tire with steel in the sidewalls.

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writes:

You are correct, there is no steel in the sidewall. Steel belts are only in the tread area.
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IYM wrote:

I picked up 3 decent tires on craigslist. The guy had damaged one of the set and was anal enough that he didn't want a mismatched tire.
As for the OP, my pickup doesn't get out much and is on retreads that are old enough to vote. Two have developed sidewall leaks just sitting in the driveway. I figured if they were that far gone I would trust a tube, hence craigslist. I just couldn't see dropping $150 a tire for something that gets out of the driveway once a year or so.
When I was looking, I saw a lot of tires on craigslist.
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On 11/4/2014 2:20 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

> cut could lead to a blow out.

Some decades ago, I used to have box of sidewall patches. NOt sure I'd trust one.
I'd also suggest replace.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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writes:

Worst advice ever. A tube will not work, that's why they do not put them in. Firstly, without a rim that can be taken apart, the tire mounting machine can pinch the tube and damage it before the first pound of air goes in. Secondly, tubeless tires are built differently than tube-type tires. Thirdly, the sidewall of a tire is by design the weakest part of the tire, it is typically two-ply where the tread is four-ply. The sidewall constantly moves and changes shape, and if there is a tear, then the tear will be even weaker and a catastrophic failure is all but certain.
At best, a tube will hold air. It will not make the sidewall sufficient to carry the vehicle. Do not put a tube into a tubeless tire. You have to go to the tire store to have the tire and rim broken down, so they are the venue for putting the tube in and they will not do it.
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Oh, thanks. We all needed someone to quibble over what the word "work" means.
I think my post was clear enough.
--
Dan Espen

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That's the point, a tube should not work. A tube has Epic Fail written all over it, hence, "Worst advice ever." I cleared your post up.
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On Wed, 5 Nov 2014 10:11:48 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"

Jeff, tubes have been used on steel safety rims for several decades. That's the exact same rim used on today's cars (alloy wheels have the same rim profiles) You just have to know what you are doing. I've installed a few hundred tires with tubes over my life as amechanic - only damaged a very few tubes.
The bigger problem is tubeless tires have ridges on the inside that cause heating when the flex against a tube - and radials are worse than bias ply. There ARE special tubes made for use in radial tires that work in tubeless tires but are NOT recommended for high speeds.
Also a bruised sidewall is likely to also damage the tube by abrasion

Worse yet, the fabric on a radial sidewall is RADIAL - which makes it even more fragile than a bias ply sidewall

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The 'know what you are doing' part is the rub. I bought a set of tube type tires in Knoxville and the inbred knuckledraggers managed to pinch all four tubes. Thanks to copious quantities of fix-a-flat and a portable air pump, I made it back to Arizona. Mexican mechanics still understand tubes.
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wrote:

The "secret" is simply to lightly inflate the tube before installing the second bead, then inflate to low pressure, bounce the wheel, and inflate to seat the bead. Sure isn't rocket science!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yup, works great 98% of the time. I put a Kenda 21" knobby on the front wheel of one of the bikes. The rear went like planned, but that damn front bead would not seat. I aired it up to 90 psi, aired it down, poured on soapy water, beat on it, took it out for a ride, and it finally seated. I'm going back to Dunlop 606's next time.
I learned to deal with tubes damn near 60 years ago changing tires on my genuine 'English' bicycle with the three speed Sturmey-Archer planetary hub. I also learned there are a lot of springs in one of those things, but that's another story.
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Jeff Strickland wrote:

I'll try to remember that the next time I'm mounting new tires on my bike.
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Different tire. Absolutely no comparison after the part about rubber and round.
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Jeff Strickland wrote:

A rim is a rim, a tire is a tire, and a set of tire irons is a set of tire irons. The last time I had a problem breaking a tire down was on a '51 Chevy. Back then you had a bumper jack with a flat foot plate and the standard method was to put the plate on the bead and jack away. I knew I had a problem when the car went up and the bead didn't let go.
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