steel brake lines

Hi folks. Could anyone tell me what size of brake line was used on 1994 Ford Taurus? Also, what type of flared end I should buy? Bubble flare or another
type?? Am looking to replace a section of rusted line with a replacement length and a compression fitting, if this is possible. Any tips or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.. John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I assume it's rear line. Note that Ford tends to use non-standard flare nuts at one end of line for assembly purposes. There are actual brass adapters available ..DONT use the kluge short line adapters that Autozone sells. OR break the line and use the OEM nut if it's still in good shape.
I have tried comprssion fittings to join lines and dont recommend it. They tend to rust under the ferrule or seep.
Get a double flare tool at Harbor freight and practice.
Here's another hint.. to remove the old line, just use PB Blaster, cut the line and use a 6-point socket on fitting, before even TRYING a tubing wrench. Saves some frustration.
--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John J wrote:

to fit. Use the old lines as a template.
Bob
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John J wrote:

The compression fitting repair on brake lines is a bad idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" The compression fitting repair on brake lines is a bad idea. "
It's also illegal for street use in some jurisdictions, and if the inspection station doesn't catch it, but a 'post accident investigation' does, you'll really be in deep...
-- ERIC GIRONDA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes..I've started to see that...from what I've been reading up on. I'm going to try and cut and flare a new section in. Line looks good up front. Thanks to all for tips and info.Great source of info here. Thank you. JJ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John J wrote:

If you try to cut and flare the old line while it's on the vehicle, you'll be hating life in short order. You'll find that "other" rusty spot in the line pretty quick when you disturb it, along with any weak spots in the line going to the other rear wheel that runs next to it. Why not get about 10' of bulk tubing, flare the front and attach it, cut to length. flare the rear and attach it, then anchor the new line to the old one. It's actually easier than patching the old line and fewer possibilities for leaks. The old line and the new pre cut sections are harder than the bulk line (which is milder steel). You'll have to have a good quality flaring tool (Mac, Snap On, OTC, etc) to flare it. The lower cost tools like the one available at Sears, Auto Zone, etc. will tend to distort and crack the line at the new flares. Been there, done that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Boy..today I certainly did not enjoy life..!.. Was able to remove the old fitting from the "proportioning valve?" block after cutting the line and using socket per previous advice..actually removed both right side rusty lines and cut them a foot or so in front of the rear wheel. The flare on the line I removed was a bubble type, so the guy at the parts store got me some adapter fittings so I could use the precut lengths they sold which had double flares. Anyway.. I practiced several flares on a piece of the old line, with no luck.. I mean I couldn't even get that line to bend over for the first part of the flare. Is it possible the old line is just too thick to double flare?..I'm sort of dead in the water here.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John J wrote:

The key statement was: The old line and the new pre cut sections are harder than the bulk line > (which is milder steel). You'll have to have a good quality flaring tool > (Mac, Snap On, OTC, etc) to flare it.
Often the clamp can't hold the line well enough and it slides down through it, when using cheaper tools. I really recommend the softer, more flexible bulk line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.