Taurus brakes problem - help please

Bought my 93 Taurus (3.0L) during my sophomore yr in college, 80K on it then. Now I am in grad school, I've stacked another 80K on...Good car, trouble free most of the time.
I was driving on the highway and noticed a loud screeching noise (also the brake pedal sank to the floor lost 60% braking power). It was the inner rear brake pad (disc brake) I just replaced 1 month ago grinded bare to the metal, the outer pad is fine (looked unused, brake pad on the other rear wheel looked fine as well). The caliper dust boot is broken but can be retracted. So I replaced worn pad.
Q1, why was the new brake pad grinded bare? What could have caused it?
Q2, do I need to get a new caliper set? Can the broken dust boot be repaired?
Q3, if the old caliper needs to go, what kind caliper set should I get? Loaded or unloaded.
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Scott opined in

If the weardown was even across the pad, you answered the question above. the piston stuck because of dirt.. boot is there for a reason.

At least one caliper... both if the other boot is broken. Once dirt gets in it's history.

Now if the wear was uneven across the face, then the caliper was cocked.. happened to my 95 Taurus. And i suspect the same happened to you
Needs new pins. But you still must replace the caliper. Make sure the pins on the other side are free and lubricated.
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pretty good...thanks
Yeah the wear was uneven.
"pins" you are talking about are the Hex head screws that holds caliper together right?
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Scott opined in

More than screws! It's how the caliper self-positions itself. Talk to an older guy at the parts counter or read the Haynes.
They must be free to slide, the boots for the pins must be in good shape and they have to be lubed, with hi-temp lube
Don tforget, if the piston boots are torn, it will eventually hang.
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how can the caliper pin be taken out without damaging the rubber elastomer part? I have a tub of high temp break grease, can that be used to lube the pins?
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Scott opined in

I think we're miscommunicating... or I have a faulty memory
Teh pins I am talking about are the ones that are smooth for most of their length, then threaded where the pins screw into the bracket. \ It's roughness/rust on the "pin" part that caused the caliper to hang.
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http://pics.bbzzdd.com/users/lisc0/ford_brake.jpg
please check the photo I've taken. just cut the paste the address...wouldn't work by clicking on it.
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Scott opined in

Yep, that's the pins
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scotty snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Scott) wrote in message

Why did you say "break" instead of "brake"? Any Grad school student would know that there is a difference between "brake" and "break".
i.e.
Realizing that she was about to run a "nazi camera" stop light, she hit the *brake* to the floor.
as opposed to ---
The bandits in town decided that they were going to *break* into the 1890's victorian style house on the corner.
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Eastward Bound opined

Good try!
That switch usually drives me nuts as it points out a certain lack of literacy in most, esp when coupled with other miss-spells...
However since he in most or all OTHER instances used the correct spelling, that makes it a typo
and makes you an asshole
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I agree. :-)
Although my spelling error is inversely proportional to the amount of words I have to type.
Any tips on how to remove those pins without damages or special tools?
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Scott opined in

the pins and bolt are the same
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Actually, I think there is a short bolt that goes into the pin. From your pic I think you are getting carried away. The pin boots look to be in good shap. If you pull the little boot back you will see the pin. It probably just needs a little high temp grease if its dry or rusty. If you release the inner side of the little boot you will find that the caliper will/should slide on/off the pin. Also when tightening watch the washer just under the bolt that it lines up right(it has two flat spots on it that need to line up......no biggy.
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Yes! absolutely correct.
carried out as instructed, worked great.
for noob DIYers, be careful when peeling bottom of the rubber pin boots.
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Glad you got it done :)

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Scott opined in

Good... I have to apologize profusely! I had gotten that mixed up with another type.
And just yesterday I came across an extra set of pins/bolts that I had bought for the taurus
A Big OOOPPS!
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