Thank god for extended warranties

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wrote:


I do agree with you, in that I didn't buy the insurance to make money or come out ahead. Remember that I just got rid of a car with a blown engine, so that thought was running around in my head. And, heaven forbid, I don't buy health insurance with the idea of coming out "ahead.." That said, and agreeing with you, worst case scenerio, a new car is a lot cheaper than cancer.
From what many of you are saying, I should have kept the money and driven to Vegas -- "maybe" I would have come out ahead.
I think you just run the what ifs in your head and make a decision, whether its a trip to Vegas or a car warranty. I still think I did good in this case, but the vast majority of the time I never buy an extended warranty on anything.
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On Sat, 5 Jun 2010 20:04:53 -0600, "Sheldon"

I'm generally against extended warranties too. However, I have bought them on three cars and in every case I got back between 70% and 100% of what I paid for them. So I did lose money but I never had to worry about getting them repaired. I keep a vehicle typically for at least 15 years so I look for a very long warranty purchased separately from the dealer. They run from 7 to 10 years in length and the typical cost per year is $170. It can be thought of as prepaying for repairs - For example, on my new car with a 10 year extended warranty I'm effectively paying no more then $350 a year ($100 deductible) for any and all repairs (I'm only counting the 7 years after the factory warranty runs out). If I didn't have the warranty I'd wind up fixing it my self most of the time (that's just the way I am) so it's also like paying to not have to work. And while others don't care about the "peace of mind" aspect, I do. It's a lot different when you are looking at paying for an extended warranty on a blender, I'm not likely to get stuck out of town due to my blender breaking down and have to go to some unknown repair shop and hope for the best at whatever price they quote.
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The Escape is built on the Ford CD2 platform, which is in turn based on the Mazda GF platform, which was used by the Mazda 626. It's a car, not a truck (albeit with big wheels and slightly higher off the ground).
Derek
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Derek Gee wrote:

It's licensed as a truck.
Jeff
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dr_jeff wrote:

The manufacturer designates it as a SUV...Many states did not have the capability or desire to revamp their systems when registering vehicles when SUV's hit the scene, so either it was a car, truck or van. As the first "SUV's" (Large Broncos, Full size Blazers/Jimmys, etc) were mostly trucks, that's what they got registered with. There were only a handful of the first small SUV's models (Bronco II and S-10 Blazers) and were close to the small pickups (Rangers, etc) so they were grouped in as a truck too. But these new SUV's are so far from a truck, they don't deserve to be called trucks. Call it what you like, but the Escape is not a truck. I laughed at the service guy when he called my Saturn Vue a truck. I said "I have a F-150 - that's a truck, and a small one at that...My Vue is not a truck" and he said "it's not a car". *sigh* I'd be more willing to call it a mini-van than a truck.
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wrote:

And today's F150 is far from a "small" truck.Compared to a 1953 3/4 ton Checy or F series it is an absolute behemoth
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On Tue, 1 Jun 2010 22:55:33 -0400, "Derek Gee"

to meet van safety requirements. And a HHR, which is also car based, is also a van. And what was a Ranchero, or a El Camino, or a Dodge Rampage????

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They're cars too. I seem to recall reading a article talking about the PT Cruiser being certified as a light truck for CAFE reasons. I suspect the HHR is a "truck" for the same reason.
Here's one article that says that...
http://www.autoworld.com/news/Chrysler/RetroPT_Cruiser.htm

What platforms were they on? That's before my time.
Derek
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Actually the Mazda are generally based on the Ford designed chassis, not the other way around. It is no unusual to first sell the lower volume vehicle before using it on a high volume vehicle. The Mazda version of the Ranger was an exception, however.

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Mike Hunter wrote:

Which Mazdae are built on platforms developed by Ford, rather than Mazda? Of all the cars that I know of that share a platform for Ford and Mazda, Mazda designed it.
You're right. The Ford Ranger and Mazda B-series sold in the US, Canada, Brasil, Chile, Mexico and Argentia is an exception to the rule. It was built on a Ford Platform. However, the European Ford Ranger (sold in all countries except those listed above) is actually a Mazda-designed truck.
Jeff

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wrote:

The Ranger is a FORD design, through and through - sold as a Mazda. The Courier was a Mazda design - sold as a Ford. ANd I'm not sure how much "ford DNA" is in the 626 Mazda, on which platform the Ford Fusion is based. Same with the ealier Mazda based Escort and the current Mazda-based Focus.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It is an exception to the rule that most Ford vehicles that share a platform with Mazda as based on a Mazda design, not a Ford design.
There are two Ford Rangers. The one sold in the US is designed by Ford. The one sold in most other countries, including those in Europe, is designed by Mazda.

Actually, the Ford Focus is based on a European design. The Mazda 3 series is also based on the same European design. The next generation Focus will be the same as the one sold in Europe, rather than just based on a European-designed platform.
Likewise, the Ford Escort platform was derived from a European design.
Jeff
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a thinly disguised 323.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The engine was the same. I think the original Escort was derived from the European Escort, although it had little in common with it. I don't think it was until the second generation that Mazda got heavily involved.
Either way, it was a best-selling car.
Jeff
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English Escort. The Escort 2000 Mexico of that period was a REAL car. They were front engine rear drive like the Cortina (and Pinto) but smaller
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I was referring to the basic chasses. The "Ranger," sold by Mazda, his different packaging and trim but it is the same vehicle and is assembled in the same Ford assembly plant. The previous Mazda pickup and was imported as was the Ford version until Ford started to built the "Ranger," sold by Mazda
It is only the Ford designed chassis that is used by Mazda in the "6," the drive train, body panels and interior are Mazda designs.
The Taurus, Flex and Lincoln MKS are all built off the same basic chassis, but everyone is different than the other.

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Mike Hunter wrote:

The Ranger is sold by Ford, not Mazda. Mazda doesn't even sell a pickup any more.

That was the Ford Courier.

Finally, you got it right. Before, you said: "Actually the Mazda are generally based on the Ford designed chassis, not the other way around."

Please note that there are two Ford Rangers. The US model is made by Ford. The model in most countries outside the US (including Europe, Africa and Asia) is designed by Mazda. In addition, Ford may stop selling the US Ranger at the end of the next model year. It is expected to close the plant in the next couple of years.

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Madza were the lead engineers on the Ford Escape and Mazda Tribute project. Check with your "Ford sources" if you doubt me.
Derek
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On Thu, 3 Jun 2010 22:00:37 -0400, "Derek Gee"

Torino) platform - and actually used many of the body parts and virtually all the running gear parts, of those base models. The El Camino started on the full-sized Chevy car platform and migrated to the Chevelle / Malibu - again using the car front body sheetmetal and complete running-gear/chassis from the car. The Rampage was built on the Onmi/Horizon TC3 platform - again using all the chassis parts and front sheet-metal.
Moving on to the dodge Ram mini-van and the Magic-wagon derivatives - they were based on the K-Car platform - but used NONE of the K-Car sheet-metal - not even the floor pans. Same goes for the PT, based on the Neon platform - and the HHR based on the Cobalt?.
Because when the rear seats are stowed or removed they have a flat load floor they are all considered VANS - not cars.
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