Toyota, GM, and Ford differences

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And how many Toyotas that were built in the 1980's and early 90's do you see still on the road compared to domestic brands?
Personally I think that all manufacturers design and build cars to last no longer than 10 years now before they fall apart. I had a 79' Datsun B-210 that the steering box rotted away from the chassis somewhere around 1988 or so. I was going down the road at the time of failure. I've been skeptical about the build and design of Asian built cars ever since.
I do own at present a 97' Hyundai Tiburon with approximately 195,000 miles on it that hasn't given very much trouble, but when there is a problem I have found that it takes a long time to get parts and they are very expensive compared to domestic parts.
...Ron -- 68'RS Camaro 88'Formula 00'GT Mustang
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RSCamaro wrote:

Too long ago to matter.
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RSCamaro wrote:

box falls off look at the hood by god it has hinges on it wow look under it and take care of the freakin piece of metal and parts they work better keep looking under the hood. Dont drive till it dies then ask WHY OH WHY ME!!!
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DH wrote:

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Uhh, Hey Mikey, there are actually only 2 domestic automobile manufactures left in the US, Daimler Chrysler is a German company... Doh!
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351CJ wrote:

that means even gm and ford and the damiler c are all foriegn cars right ..?
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Mike Hunter wrote:

Thank is true but their share is shrinking every year.
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A long time ago there was a salesman sent from Japan to USA to investigate if they could sell them a car they were making in Japan
The telephone connections were not very good
The salesman went to USA and showed some people pictures of the car then he went on the phone to headquarters and told them to send one car over and he thought it would be best to put a brandname on the car he had heard people talk about when he showed the picture "Toy auto"
After the car came over the car sold immediately and the salesguy phoned back to order another one and the reply at headquarters was "Dat soon?"
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Doesn't make a damn what they sell, Mike. They are approaching bankruptcy. If they lose money on every car, it is hard to make up the difference on volume.
Financial gurus, banks, etc all predict that bankruptcy is the most likely outcome for GM and Ford, and perhaps is their salvation.
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Lots of 'ifs' your post. The naysayers had Chrysler going out of business in the seventies and Ford in the eighties but they are both still here. LOL
mike hunt

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Mike Hunter wrote:

The only reason Chrysler is still around is because the Germans bought them. If Hyundai buys out GM sometime in the next 10 years (not that I expect it to happen, but simply as a thought experiment) will you consider that to mean that GM is "still here"?
As businesses GM and Ford are both in trouble right now.
Do you remember when Sears was the 800 lb. Gorilla of US retailing? It was not very long ago, and today Sears continues to wander in the wilderness of great businesses. Sears long time nemesis Montgomery Ward is completely gone ... even oil company money couldn't save 'em.
John
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You do realize Kmart bought Sears, right?
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Or did Sears buy K-Mart? Or did a 3rd party buy both?

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SgtSilicon wrote:

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SgtSilicon wrote:

Well, a third party bought K-Mart out of bankrupcy and then bought Sears. Then he renamed the whole thing Sears, just to keep it confusing.
John
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If you cant be happy where you are, its a cinch you wont be happy where you aint.
| > Mike Hunter wrote: | >> Lots of 'ifs' your post. The naysayers had Chrysler going out of business | >> in the seventies and Ford in the eighties but they are both still here. | >> LOL | >> | > | > The only reason Chrysler is still around is because the Germans bought | > them. If Hyundai buys out GM sometime in the next 10 years (not that I | > expect it to happen, but simply as a thought experiment) will you consider | > that to mean that GM is "still here"? | > | > As businesses GM and Ford are both in trouble right now. | > | > Do you remember when Sears was the 800 lb. Gorilla of US retailing? It | > was not very long ago, and today Sears continues to wander in the | > wilderness of great businesses. Sears long time nemesis Montgomery Ward | > is completely gone ... even oil company money couldn't save 'em. | > | > | > John | | You do realize Kmart bought Sears, right? | | Actually, I believe that it was classified as *a merger* with KMart pulling Sears out of the doldrums. Whatever, they are a couple now...And, I thought that Chrysler went into the DC merger in great cash flow shape, and the Germans drained the $$$ in a hurry.
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351CJ wrote:

Yes I do, and both combined continue to wander in the business wilderness. What really happened is that a real estate speculator bought K-mart out of bankrupcy and then bought Sears. Then he renamed the combined company Sears.
20 years ago Sears was #1 and K-mart was #2, much like GM and Ford. Now Sears-Kmart is one company and together is still a basket case.
John
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Mike Hunter wrote:

Chrysler was saved by a federal loan guarantee and the minivan. Iacocca wanted to build the FWD minivan while at Ford, but the board refused to fund a FWD chassis, something Chrysler already had in development (K-car) by the time Iacocca joined the company. Minivans gave Chrysler a profit of $1500 per vehicle from the beginning, and currently each one nets $5000-7000.
Ford greatly improved in the 1980s mostly because of a very good chairman, Donald Petersen, the decision to copy the Audio 5000 FWD sedan, and by not overly increasing production capacity. Ford was also helped by GM's stumbles.
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I spent over thirty years of my life as a automotive design engineer, retiring in 1986 at age 60. Your recollection is a bit foggy. FWD cars cost more for manufactures to build than the larger RWD vehicles they replaced. Chrysler had to sell their new smaller 4 cy FWD cars for at least 20% more than the larger V8 and 6 cy RWD cars they replaced, to earn a profit. The economies of scale of using one chassis to make ten variation of the same basic vehicle chassis was what enabled Chrysler to afford the billons to convert their assembly plants to FWD.
mike hunt

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