Toyota quality

Page 4 of 5  
wrote:


In Canada at least, you a WRONG. Customers cars are first. Those with any sign of stiffness get priority. Then come sold cars on dealers lots, then dealer inventory.
New cars are unlikely to have a problem as it is a "combination of wear and humidity" that is causing the problem. This whole thing is being blown WAY out of proportion.
And the "braking" problem on the Hybrids??? Do you realize FORD has had to reflash the code on some of their hybrids for the same problem?? Switching from regen to friction brakes is NOT seamless, so the "impression" of reduced breaking is there.
Not a safety issue at this point as far as anyone knows - but definitely a "driveability" type problem.
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DUH, no wonder, one can drive for miles in Canada without ever encountering another vehicle. ;)

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On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 15:30:35 -0500, "Mike Hunter"

You've OBVIOUSLY never driven through Toronto, Montreal, or Vancouver. Or Cambridge. Never driven the 401 between London and Whitby either - particularly between Kitchener/Cambridge and the DVP (Hwy 404)

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I spent a week in Montreal, one night ;)

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On 1/27/2010 6:36 AM, iluv my kitties and family wrote:

That's what they get for assembling in America. American workers suck. Union and non union. America deserves the fourth world status they will soon have. All the money is in communist hands and we gave it to them. We bought cheap, (read foreign made) and it has now, irreversibly come back to bite us on the ass.
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zimpzampzormp wrote:

Such a loving person you are-not.
--
Civis Romanus Sum

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Get real! American parts my a$$. Toyota screwed up, get us to it. Parts are made by suppliers to the manufactures specs, no matter who are where they are made. Aygo and Yaris made in Europe and Camrys and Avalons, made in Japan as also recalled. Philippe Boursereau, spokesman for Toyota of France says, "The total number of models potentially under recall for Europe is still under evaluation," as well.

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You know, if it was GM or Chrysler, they would have denied it was a problem for years. Toyota did the right thing.
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Nice try. Actually Toyota knew about the problem since 2007, according to newspaper reports.

You know, if it was GM or Chrysler, they would have denied it was a problem for years. Toyota did the right thing.
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That number was from the USA Today report. It turns out that Toyota actually knew in 2004!!!!
http://forums.motortrend.com/70/8054459/the-general-forum/toyota-knew-back-in-2004-from-first-camary-death/index.html
Derek
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Toyota, UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED
Where's Ralph Nader? This is worst than the Corvair, it's all toyota's for years !
How many needless death's have occured that we may never know about?
How many innocents have been killed or maimed due to corprate greed?
It's a company that had a known defect for years and years and yet they knowingly still unloaded their unsafe vehicles on an unsuspecting public while touting great safety to the unsupecting public.
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edspyhill01 wrote:
<snip>

The key thing here is that Toyota was pro-active in issuing the recall which they were not legally required to do (but the stop sale order is something that they likely would have been ordered to do if they hadn't done so voluntarily). If you look back on _far_ more serious safety recalls on Ford and GM products, those companies were forced, kicking and screaming, to do safety recalls, which led to consumers abandoning them en-masse, essentially forever. You would hear these consumers complaining about rental cars, and there company's fleet cars, where they had no choice but to have a GM or Ford.
It's one thing to fight a recall that is not safety related (i.e. excessive oil burning) that doesn't have a direct impact on safety. I remember VW fighting the recall on some their water-cooled engines where valve stem seals had a problem, though eventually they capitulated.
Consumers are pretty reasonable. If they buy a product that turns out to have a problem, and the manufacturer fixes the problem without a hassle, then they're likely to continue as a loyal customer. The reason the U.S. vehicle manufacturers got into such trouble is that they were so arrogant that you still here the familiar story of "I bought a (GM, Ford, Chrysler) once--never again." Toyota and Honda understood that the key to a long term business plan was to keep selling more product to happy repeat customers.
Ford seems to be turning around, and hopefully they'll adopt Toyota's attitude the next time they encounter a problem like this.
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Where have YOU been? The feds ordered Toyota to issue the recall, dummy

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This is pretty much BS. Toyota had a choice - issue a "voluntary" recall or have NHTSA issue a mandatory one. If you wait till you have a gun to your head to volunteer to do something, it is self serving BS to claim you are a good guy for doing it. This is not a new problem. Toyota has been aware of it for years. Only after multiple death and a lot of negative publicity and NHTSA threats did Toyota do anything "voluntarily." This has been Toyota's standard operating procedure forever. Look back over history - rusting frames, bad ball joints, defective suspensions, etc.,etc. Toyota does nothing until public pressure or NHTSA forces them to do so.

At least in recent history, this has not been true for Ford. Ford and NHTSA administration agreed that only few vehicle merited recall for the cruise control switch problem, but Ford has pretty much recalled them all. Or the Firestone tire recall. Ford recalled all the bad tires even when Firestone tried to weasel out. I don't have much experience with GM, so I can't comment on the GM recall history, but I suspect it is far better than you think. And if you would look through the NHTSA database I think you'd find that Toyota is far worse than either Ford or GM. I have no idea how they have created this perception that they are good guy when they have one of the worst histories of responding to Customer Complaints of any company selling cars in the US.
Ed
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2010 12:56:16 -0500, "C. E. White"

And GM does? Or Ford? Replacing ball joints and steering racks and inner tie-rod ends on GM Front Drive vehicles has been a "profit center" for dealerships and general repair garages for years. Sam,e with the sloppy "rubber" steering linkage parts on Fords.

Perhaps because people are more likely to COMPLAIN about a (percieved or real) problem with a Japanese car than a domestic???
Not saying it is so - but a very good possibility.
People buying American iron have come to expect some problems, while owners of Toyotas and other "quality" imports have come to expect NO problems. When problems occur, it is BIG NEWS.
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I think the opposite is true. Toyotra owners have deluded themselves in to putting up with mediocrity and liking it. The little old lady a two doors down was having trouble getting her Corolla started a couple of days back. I went over to help. It was obvious the problem was the typoical bad contacts in the starter solenoid that it seems all Toyota eventually suffer from. I was able to get the car started and sugggested she take it in and have the starter fixed (I know you can just replace the contacts, but the dealer will probably replace the starter - much more profit). Ths is about the fourth time in the last four months something has been wrong with this car. And guess what - she tells me how great the car isand how much she loves her Toyota. In my opinion. even if the car never failed, it is a POS. It is was all I could do to wedge myself intot he car to get it going. The paint is faded, it uses oil, the interior is falling apart - yeah a great car - NOT. But she thinks it is....Oh what a feeling.

I think Toyota owners have developed a religous belief that all Toyota problems are minor and that things are much worse for the owners of other cars. This delusions allows them to excuse sticking accelerator pedals, failing balljoints, rusting frames, collasping suspensions and just tell people how mcuh worse things would be if they owned another brand.
Ed
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(Cross posting removed, automatically)

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wrote:

Indeed. Plus, it appears that the floor mats and pedals are probably not the extent of the issue. One TV report this weekend claimed that the majority of fatalities reported to the NHTSA due to unexpected acceleration in the last decade had nothing to do with either issue. You can also find print reports discussing the same thing ( http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-toyota-throttle29-2009nov29,0,5254584.story ). Makes you want to know just how forthcoming Toyota has been. Also, what is scarier, that they aren't fixing the actual problem or that they don't know what it is? This is not an issue that suddenly popped up late last year. If Toyota knows what the problem is, they certainly could have been "pro-active" and issued a recall and updated new models years ago. If not, then they don't know, which is bad, or they have been avoiding a safety related recall and continuing to pump out defective vehicles for years, which is even worse. Just glad our new Prius is unaffected, for now, anyway...
Toyota is no different than almost every other huge company. The bottom line comes first and big recalls don't help the bottom line.
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2010 08:08:50 -0800, SMS wrote:

Yeah, but you're (I can't BELIEVE I'm saying this!!!) rational. A lot of people, esp those with their first Toyotas are going to remember the time they bought a Toyota that could have KILLED them!!!
Those of us who have had them for years, trouble and near maintenance free, can kind of excuse the company that has treated us so well for so many years. The American car lovers will never forget, as will the owners who bought their first Toyota based on popularity or another owner's recommendation and got dumped on.
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Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

I had a Toyota Land Cruiser that had a couple of recalls. One was for a problem with welds on the baffles in the gas tank. I can't remember what the other one was for. I had no ill feelings toward Toyota that after about ten years they found a problem that did not reveal itself for a long time.
I had a lot more ill feelings toward Honda when they acknowledged a design issue with the cruise control in my old CR-V, and then said that they had no intention of solving the problem (even though the fix would have not cost them all that much).
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