Waterpump 1984 E350

I am trying to change a waterpump in a 1984 E350. It seems the threads need to be rethreaded on the two boltholes that go into the engine block.
The bolts go through the timing chain cover.
The timing chain cover has to be removed right?
So the crankshaft pulley damper has to be removed with a gearpuller right?
So i will need to drill with a 21/64 inch bit and then tap into the hole and then rethread and then I will need to put the damper back on with an 80 pound torque right?
I will then need to reseal the timing chain gasket cover and reattach the oil pan.
OK seems easy enough.
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go
hole
with an

reattach
If your going to remove all that you might as well replace the chain and gear as well. And install a sleeve on the damper, by know there is a groove wore in it. sleeve is $5.
Whitelightning.
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Thanks.
Engine was rebuilt maybe 20,000 miles ago. How can I tell if the timing chain was replaced?
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ladeeda wrote:

At 20K the chain and gears "should" be ok, as in nearly like new. There is a spec for timing chain deflection but I don't know it offhand. With the timing cover off, turn the crankshaft clockwise a bit (1/4 turn) to take up the slack. Grab the chain between the gears to your left as you are looking at the motor. Move the chain side to side. If more than about 1/8" of motion you will want to consider replacing it. More than 1/4", replace it for sure. If the cam gear is all steel and the timing set is that new, it's probably a non issue. What happened to the threads? You're right about removing the timing cover, but how did they get damaged in the first place. Those covers (assuming a 5.8L\351 engine) develop corrosion in the through holes for 4 of the WP bolts. The corrosion spreads and causes internal and external water leaks. If the assembler didn't clean the holes or replace the cover you may have the problems occur again when you try to assemble it. IIRC, the same thing hapens to the 460 timing covers, I'm not all that familiar with them. On the small block Fords (302\351) it's common to replace an OEM timing cover due to corrosion in the water pump bolt area when rebuilding. You may want to consider a new timing cover if it wasn't done on your 20K rebuild. It could save problems down the road.
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that
in
There is a spec

timing cover off,

Grab the chain

the chain side to

replacing it. More

timing set is

cover, but how

5.8L\351 engine)
I thought it would be easier. I do not know what I am doing. But the threads appear to be dirty full of dust and whatever and I was not aware of putting too much torque on it while reassembling. The bolts were pretty hard to take out in the first place. If the tap was an inch longer I would be able to clean the threads without haveing to drop the oil pan and remove the harmonic balancer to get the cover off. Maybe I could spray some PB blaster in there and try to clean the remaining threads just enough to get this to hold together for a few more miles so I can be better prepared.

corrosion spreads

clean the holes
Right. No leaks were visible that I saw but water was overheating shooting out the pressure valve. Which I supected was the waterpump because the coolant was not circulating in the radiator.

try to assemble

that familiar

an OEM timing

You may want to

could save

It looks ok. I think the holes may have been clogged with gasket sealant.
But I am suspecting the waterpump was never replaced. The lifetime should be longer on a waterpump.
Thanks
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That last statement leads me to question if you did indeed have a water pump failure here...
Maybe it's just as simple as a stuck (closed) thermostat) or something as serious as a head gasket leaking compression pressure into the coolant...
Most waterpump failures signal themselves with noise or leaks or both; not the failure to circulate water.
Good Luck, Chuck
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water pump

that would suck.

as
I replaced the thermostat

coolant...
Lets hope not since the engine was recently rebuilt.

not
You brought up some good points for me to check.
Like possible retirement.
thanks.
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If the tap was an inch

Several times I have welded a bolt on the end of a tap to get extra length. PB Blaster or some other solvent/lubricant should be used when chasing the threads.
Dave
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the
length.
the
Sounds like a good idea.
Maybe I should learn how to weld. It would definately be a useful skill.
Right now I am trying to get the 15/16 bolt off of the crankshaft pulley. To pull the harmonic balancer off. The crankshaft keeps spinning and I cannot get a nail into the balancer to wedge it in. Maybe I should use something else.
Or maybe just junk it.
the engine and the transmission is rebuilt. The tires are fairly new and other things like a new starter.
I need a work vehicle to compete with illegal aliens.
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ladeeda wrote:

Borrow or rent an electric impact wrench. Looks like a big electric drill. It's similar to the air wrenches they use for removing the lug nuts on a wheel. It will make quick work of getting the crank bolt off. It applies a lot of torque with a pulsating action which will loosen the bolt before the pulley can start rotating. If you use the electric wrench to install the crank bolt, don't over do it. It's easy to strip threads with these tools. Another possibility is holding the pulley with a strap wrench. This is a lever handle with a flexible band which wraps around the pulley to hold it. I prefer the electric impact wrench. You can find other uses for it if you buy one.
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If it's a manual tranny, put it in reverse, engage the parking brake and have at it.
Kinda neanderthal, but put a breaker bar with the appropriate sized socket on the crank bolt and whack it with a hammer. The shock of the hammer blows should pop it loose.. Just be careful the socket doesn't pop off the bolt head and round off the corners.
If you have an impact wrench, that'll pop it loose for sure.
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"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in message wrote:

spinning
should
I do have an impact wrench that I bought with a 150 gal compressor from Sears. I have not used either once. The impact wrench was returned once. I am in Florida and the seals melted sitting in the shed. The one they replaced it with does not work either. The trigger spring is broken. The compressor will not shut off automatic. $300 ripoff. What ever happened to pride in America.
What I did do was took the security shield off the front part of the tranny and put a 9/16 wrench on the spindle gear there is one bolt on it and wedged it in. I used a cheater bar by extending the ratchet 2 foot in length. I got the bolt off but am now trying to determine if it needs to stay off in order to remove the harmonic balancer. IT looks as if they are two separate pieces. I put the bolt back on but am hoping I used an 80 pound torque..The Chilton manual was not complete in its directions.
I have to get this thing back on the road to compete with illegal aliens. or junk it.
Thanks both of you.
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Ok got the balancer off
Got the timing chain cover off
got the driverside waterpump bolthole snapped off at the engine block. The side has that 1/4 inch thick circumferance surrounding the hole. It is the edge of the block.
It looks like this baby is retired.
Unless I can get JB weld to hold it together.
Naw. (MAybe) or liquid weld
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block.
Search the yellow pages for a wielder who makes house calls, have him wield in the area that snapped off, grind it smooth, drill and tap. Then use a liberal amount of anti seize on the threads and length of the bolt before installing it. Usually the bolt seizes in the timing cover and the head snaps off. Late '70s to mid '80s Buick and Olds were bad about this as well. Never liked the design, long bolts going through an aluminum timing cover to hold water pump on.
Whitelightning
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On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 22:57:56 GMT, "Whitelightning"

Pontiac engines from that era as well. Had it happen to me TWICE on my old Firebird. (Small block 350 then big block 455) Had to literally chisel the cast aluminum timing cover off the engire to get at the bolts - needless to say the timing cover was destroyed both times.
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Awesome Great advice.

It is frustrating.

. 
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Trust me buddy. we have all been in your shoes a time or two. You just havent learned how to work on a car until you have broken and retapped a bolt or two.. :D

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