What happens to the spare tire?

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It only takes approximately twenty minutes per rim & I don't mind the work. Beats driving with "winterized wheels" what Maine is famous for.
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says...

After every snowstorm, I blast the bottom of the truck with a pressure washer & clean the spare too. After the snowmelt in the warmer spring months, I remove the spare & totally hose the underside down with soap & water. Otherwise, the road salt will do a big number to the exposed iron components underneath.
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On Sat, 8 Dec 2007 18:10:21 -0500, "wlwallick"

You might only need to get one new tire now - read through this carefully, there is a logic, and when you 'get it' you'll get it.
It is very difficult to get tire shops to include the spare tire in the rotation pattern, you have to insist every time. It's more work for them to mount and dismount it from the brackets, and the tire busters always take the easy way out...
So go to the "Best Old Tire as Spare" logic. I would pick the tire that is most worn but still legal above the wear-bars and in good shape (not cupped or mis-worn tread or the sidewalls scuffed from banging into curbs a lot) and move that one to the spare.
If you have two tires that still have some good tread left, save yourself some money and put them on the rear - they wear slowly there, so should last a while. And tread depth isn't as important on the rear tires as long as they have some, in the rain/snow the front tires clean a path through the water or slush, and the rears go through that fairly dry strip a fraction of a second later. The 5 year old tire that was the spare should be fine to put on the road and get your tread wear out of it, if you inspect for dry-rot and ozone checking first. A few small cracks are normal.
And even if it will eventually fail from old age, it will invariably show evidence first if you are "in tune with the Zen of your car" and you keep an eye on it - the cracks will grow, it will go out of balance and get "lumpy", the sidewalls will get funny bulges or dents or bubbles that weren't there last week... If you see any of that, get thee to a tire shop, pronto.
Put the former spare on the front, they wear faster. Buy at least one new exact matching tire to go with the former spare, and put it on the opposite side front - you do NOT want to mix size or model tires on the same axle, they need to be fairly well matched or the handling suffers.
And on the drive axle (front or rear, depending on the car) if the tires aren't fairly well matched side to side in their rolling outer diameter (one new one worn, or different sizes) you can wear out the spider gears in the "rear end" long before their time - to the final drive, one wheel smaller is like driving around in circles all day, the gears are constantly spinning when they shouldn't be.
Front to rear exact match is not critical, even though the tire shop would love to sell you five new tires right now - Cha-Ching! The ONLY time a 4 tire match is critical is cars with Full Time 4WD - or you wear out the center differential gears from the size mis-match.
And the next time you wear out a set of tires, you trash the spare tire (now over 10 years old and dry-rot is a concern) buy 4 new tires or 2 new and put the best old ones on the rear, and put a good old tire from that batch on as the spare. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.
(I'm going to save this for the next time it comes up. It will.)
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 09:43:11 -0800, Bruce L. Bergman

My advise always has been, and continues to be, use 4 matched tires when at all possible. The spare is JUST a spare - treat it as such. Make sure it is still useable, but don't cheap out - buy 4 new tires. I'm still an advocate of never reverse mounting a tire. Once it has been a left tire - always a left tire. One a right, always a right. The tire "experts" say it's baoloney - but I've seen too many tires fail (belt and/or tread separation) when reverse mounted to discount it out of hand. This makes a five tire rotation extremely impractical.
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clare at snyder.on.ca wrote:

I agree on this, i didn't want to say anything because i figured someone would think i was crazy...
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On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 13:46:22 -0500, clare at snyder.on.ca wrote:

That was only a problem on first-generation steel radials like the Firestone 500, where they didn't get a good bond between the rubber liner layers and the steel tread and sidewall plies. They would take a directional "set" and would internally rip apart when reversed - and with the 500 if any moisture at all got inside they delaminated and came apart even without being reversed...
This was solved by Michelin very early on in the design phase of radial tires, and they sat around laughing as everyone else jumped on the steel radial tire bandwagon without doing their own homework and had to fix the problem again.
Nowadays you don't see that failure mode. And the only reason for directional tread pattern restrictions now is water dispersion.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Sun, 09 Dec 2007 15:31:29 -0800, Bruce L. Bergman

Not true I've had Michelin X tires self destroy in a very spectacular fashion when reverse mounted. Tore the 7734 out of the rear fenders when they let go!!!

Today they GENERALLY do not fail spectacularly, but belt shift "wobble" is still a VERY common tire failure mode. I will still RECOMMEND, whenever possible, to not reverse mount a tire with any significant mileage on it.
Better safe than sorry at the price of today's "performance radials"

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I wouldn't use it. You're asking for the tire to "live" for 10 years. While tires don't have a age limit, that's a long time.
It's almost better to keep one of your current tires as a spare. Tires need to rotate to fight ozone (rolling causes anti-ozone compounds to come to the surface where they are "used up").
Anyway, the guy at the tire shop has the same ability to determine a tire's fitness for service as a field medic would have to read an MRI.

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On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 12:35:47 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

HUH ?????????????????????????????
Explain this ............
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wrote:

I've heard this before. The ozone protection chemicals in the rubber continuously work their weay to the surface as the tire is run. It doesn't happen when the tire is just sitting, which is why a sitting car suffers faster tire rot than a running car (when not garaged or otherwize protected from UV and Ozone)
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