Won't Start - checked these things - ECM suspected?

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By reading everything you have done, I'll assume the pump is bad, or the ignition module is bad. But I encourage you to REREAD what I said about the ignition system. With out a pressure gauge you will never know. Also read what
I said about the other solenoids that are part of the "red" wire circuit. I know you feel that the schematic you have does not match your car. It does. That circuit is the same for car and truck equipped with EEC4 which you have. You are just having difficulty in following it so there for you are having difficulty understanding what it is tell you.

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1) I get a little confused because of all of the acronyms and names used for the same part. By the ignition module, do you mean the ignition module/control unit that sits on the side of the distributor, needs a special tool to dismount, and special goop to remount?
2) I retold you something yesterday that I had already told you and I wanted to know the implications of this. When I was checking through the wiring, as was suggested, I found absolutely no voltage, at any time, coming out of the tan wire on the outgoing side of the fuel pump relay (
http://www.rare-cancer.org/car/relaywire.gif ). (The incoming red wire showed me a full 12 volts.) You, or someone else had mentioned, that I would get a little hit on the meter when I first tried to start the engine (turn the key all the way). I did not get this blip. I tried several times and hooked the meter up through a jumper clip jammed into the housing for that wire. I even removed the insulation from that wire and tested it that way. Nothing registered, no blip. Could you tell me what that would imply to you? Thanks and take care, Sharon
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That tells you that either the red or the tan/lt grn wire is not conected to the coil in the relay. Could it be that when you put nails is the conector you spread the contacts open and now they are loose fit on the relay? Did you try putting the original fuel pump relay back in? I would test the new and old relays with your meter and the battery to see if they are the same and if they work. Will the car still start with starter fluid? Stan

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connector is bad and may have been bad. Could have gotten blown when something shorted. God knows.

Thanks, Sharon
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The terminal that goes to the red wire hook to positive 12 volts.
The terminal thet goes to the tan/lt green wire hook to negitive 12 volts.
It should make a click when you do this.
The other two terminals should now read near 0 ohm's from one terminal to the other on your ohm's meter if the relay is good.
Stan
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Got the click and the other two terminals read 1 ohm when set on the RX1K setting. Relay is good. Now I have to check out the socket that holds them (again). Take Care, Sharon
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You now know that the relay is good and how the relay works. From the testing that you did with the relay in and out of the socket you know that the socket is BAD and the relay is good. Get the fuel pump relay to work first and then move on to any other problems that you might have.
You need to get it to the point that the relay will at the very least turn on the fuel pump when you ground the tan/lt grn wire with a test lead and the key turned to run.
Stan
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your next step is to connect your test light to the orange wire, ground the tan wire and crank the engine and see if you get a light. If you do the ECM (computer) is not telling the pump to come on. If you dont get a light, with the tan grounded and you do have power to the red wire and yellow wire with the engine cranking that means the relay is bad. Sooo If you do get that light then you have a bad connection from the ECM to the tan on the relay, or a bad ECM, or a bad connection from the ignition module to the ECM, or a bad ignition module, or .....So does it light up?
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> If you ground the tan wire the pump should turn on (with the engine

I put my multimeter on it and hooked it up the way you told me to hook up the light. I got a reading on the multimeter, but it was very weak. Could be the difficulty I had getting a good connection through the back of the wires, or could be the socket (which has been my guess all along the last couple of days). I think I am going to go buy a new connector and try that, just to satisfy my own instincts.
Thanks and take care, Sharon
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It is the part that is mounted to the side of the distributor. You do not need a "special" tool to remove, just a "slightly" modified deep 1/4 socket. Yes it does require dielectric grease or "special goop".

Lets go over the very basics of DC electronics. A completed circuit has its power, ( the 12 volts you are looking at on the red wire ) the load ( the coil in the relay ) and ground ( the tan wire ). When you apply power but have no ground, source voltage ( the 12 volts you see on the red wire ) will be seen on the whole circuit up to where the open is. ( an open is like a broken wire ). If that "broken" wire is made to touch ground you now have a complete circuit, so the ground wire will now show 0 volts.
Now to the scenario you are having with what you are seeing on your car. As I told you before, when you turn the key to run, the ECM grounds the relay for a very brief time then takes the ground away. So you should see 12 volts except for the very brief moment in time that the circuit is grounded. What does your problem imply? An open relay. The tan wire is broken at the terminal in the relay socket. The ECM is always providing ground keeping the relay on. Now, the car does not run. So that would imply that; 1 you do not have fuel pressure; 2 the ECM does not see a crank signal. Now you stated that it does run on either. I think you also stated that if you jumper the yellow and orange wire the car does run. So that eliminates the ECM keeping the relay on by always grounding the relay. It also eliminates that the ECM is not getting a crank signal, so the ignition module is ok ( running engine ). What is left? A broken wire/terminal ( tan wire ) at the relay socket or bad relay. Want to do a down and dirty test on the relay socket? Make a test lamp. and with the relay removed use the test lamp to jumper the red wire and tan wire. Does it light when the key is in run, does it light when you turn the key to crank. If it is always lit with the key in run, a ground is being made. If it lights for a very brief time when you turn the key to run, normal.

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After my very huge mistake today that most likely rendered my auto useless from what you are all saying, I went to the local junk yard. They are coming on Monday to tow it out of here.
I tried to listen and communicate to the best of my ability, but it is pretty obvious by your comments, that I failedd miserably. I just wanted to thank all of you who took the time and patience to try to help me fix it. I appreciate it.
Take Care, Sharon
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A $5 noid light and 30 seconds of your time will determine whether you've fried the PCM or not. After all this I wouldn't be so quick to give up now. Fords computers are pretty well built, like Thomas said you might not have damaged it. Bob

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Oh come on, don't send a '90 Grand Marquis to the junkyard, even if you fried the EEC computer. Hell, a new used one aint a big deal to install...
After all of this, don't give up now.
It was actually quite refreshing to follow your thread compared to the nonsense usually posted by people (''My car won't start. Tell me why!")

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That's rather drastic don't you think? That is the same kind of reasoning that allowed you to make the common mistakes you made. It is no reason to give up, and certainly no reason to junk what sounds to be a perfectly good car. So stop feeling sorry for your self, step back from the car and clear your head. Then make a choice. If you want to diagnose and fix the problem we are here. It will cost you a lot less too even have the car repaired at a quality repair facility than it would be to junk it and then have to buy another car. Do not let what you don't understand make a costly choice for you. Knowledge really is power.

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Thomas, I run a voluntary organization and develop and maintain websites (free) for rare and pediatric cancers: http://www.rare-cancer.org/index.html
Between my Mom's illness, the resultant drive out west, and this car situation over the last month, I have not been responding to requests for help, support, and research that I have been receiving from parents and other patients off of my websites. This is not right!! I can not afford to pay a mechanic over $100 an hour to do all the same things that you have been walking me through (and you KNOW a Ford mechanic will do that). I am permanently disabled myself, because of my own disease process. My income really is low, I was not lying in the beginning of my posts. I appreciate your concerns and thoughts on what I should or shouldn't do, but what I REALLY need to is redirect my daily efforts back into helping the kids, parents, and patients.
Each person on here has their own personal story and circumstances that create how they approach things. I do have a lot of experience with autos. I worked for years with my husband on them before he passed away. But, I know nothing about electrical problems on a car. I have learned a lot of things because my personal life circumstances have forced me to learn them. I was hoping I could do that with this, but I was wrong. I seem to have just made matters much much worse. I am not feeling sorry for myself, I am feeling sorry for the parents and kids who need help.
Thanks and take care, Sharon
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Sharon wrote:

Maybe you should post what area of the country your in. Somebody might be close and give you a hand. I agree, that car should not be in the boneyard if the rest of its in reasonable shape.
BOB
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I am in Southern AZ, near Tucson. Take Care, Sharon
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to fix this one than try to find a replacement. After all, being that you just drove it 3K miles it cant be that bad!

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The poor gal has been going on and on with trying to get it to start. She finally had enough when she tried to test a fuel injector circuit by using an analog multimeter instead of a noid light. A message was posted that she may have fried the EEC computer by doing what she did.
I hope maybe someone in the Tucson area can donate time to help her in person after all of this. If anyone needs to succeed at getting a car running, it should be Sharon.

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unlikely Sharon. You can test them all day long with a regular test light that pulls way more amperage than a voltmeter......The reason to use a noid light is because it is easy to plug in and it has an LED type light that flashes quicker than a regular bulb. If the car has single injectors for each cylinder a regular light will pick up the flashes, I never tryed a voltmeter but it might pick them up to.
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