your blubbering warman where is your math ?

On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 03:15:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:


On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 04:33:09 GMT, "Jim Warman"

look at this blubbering fool you claim it exists but dont have a formula
on the other hand like i said
just caculate xi and xc
DO THE MATH
CASE CLOSED
perhaps u should spend more time learning simple electricity before you shoot your mouth off lmfao
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I have no need to justify myself to you..... The only time you have answered a question is to do a cut and paste. And, in the grand scheme of things, neither one of us is designing electronic circuits..... ergo, the math that either one of us needs doesn't extend to your futile cut and paste attempt, anyway.
Let's go down through your (many) mistakes..... you state that a DC circuit can have no impedance when an impedance is something that will limit current flow - by your statement, are we to assume that resistors don't work in a DC circuit? Obviously, untrue.
You state a DC circuit has no frequency.... in the modern automobile, there are many sensors that deliver information based on a DC frequency - MAF sensors, MAP sensors, hall effect switches.... if any of these have never used frequency as information, what do they use? The same smoke you're blowing out your ass?
You can't even offer decent help or instruction to a neophyte regarding a brake lamp circuit. Folks come here looking for help... not some useless little drool spot from a buffoon that can't answer a straight question.
BTW... if you had made it as far as 3rd year, you would remember them talking about the effects of reactance is a coiled conductor... the reason a coil wont spark when the circuit is "made" but it will when the circuit is opened....
Anyone's greatest fear is that some innocent person will listen to some of your turgid little comments and either cause themselves injury or add needless costs to their problems.
And don't worry... be a long time before our shop would consider hiring someone as low on the food chain as you...
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 05:16:55 GMT, "Jim Warman"

true DO THE MATH no impedence lmfao

lmfao exactly where did i saythis

diagnosed rite the first time

thats called emf tard lmfao not impedence lmfao

like using chains to break ball joints ?

lmfao sl ford will take me lmfao
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An excellent example of why a chimpanzee can be trained to drive, but shouldnt be given a drivers license
pointless drivel
Is the classic ignition system AC or DC?!!
--
- Yes, I'm a crusty old geezer curmudgeon.. deal with it! -

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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 13:26:21 GMT, Backyard Mechanic

Well, since technically transformers only work on AC, and the ignition coil is an (auto)transformer, and it converts 12 volts to roughly 60,000, I'd say you almost HAVE to take the position that the ignition system operates on AC. It is an alternating current displaced (or biased) above chassis ground by roughly 6 volts, to start with, and it kinda "floats" from there.
Take a look at the firing signature of an ignition system on a scope and you will see the AC, you will see the "bias", and you WILL see it "float"
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:11:36 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

just do the math lmfao case closed hurc ast
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 14:11:36 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

do the math and you will see that it has no impedence
lmfao hurc ast
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 23:15:25 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Actually, you are WRONG. It has an inductive reactance which changes with frequency. By definition, this is impedence.

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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 21:29:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

hmmmm lets do some math shall we? lmfao U GO GIRL
lmfao hurc ast
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opined in wrote:

Nope, it's a dc circuit.
And the coil is designed to reactance/reluctance specs; thus .. ahem.. impedance is implied.
--
- Yes, I'm a crusty old geezer curmudgeon.. deal with it! -

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On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 01:23:58 GMT, Backyard Mechanic

lmfao hey hack you said you were an engineer
you must know them specks were obtained under AC conditions
you must be snickering inside watching nelson and warman squirm
IMPEDANCE AND PHASE ANGLE RELATIONSHIPS The Impedance Z in an AC circuit is a generalized measure of the ohmic resistance of a circuit element or a combination of circuit elements. The units of Impedance is always in ohms, W.
The impedance can be used to find the emf (or voltage) across some circuit component (or combination of components) using a equation that has the same structure as Ohm's Law.
In words: The voltage across a circuit element at some moment t can be found by multiplying the element's Inpedance Z times the current not at that monent t but the current evaluated at some other time that is either ahead or behind the current moment by a time t. The time shift t can be determined once the phase angle is f known.
The Impedances of a capacitor or an inductor are frequency dependent, while that of a resistor is constant. Circuit Element(s) Impedence (W) Phase Angle (f) Z = R 0o Z = XL = wL +90o Z = XC =1/wC -90o 0o < f < 90o -90o < f < 0o f > 0o if XL > XC f = 0o if XL = XC (Resonance) f < 0o if XL < XC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Voltage and Current Phase Angle Relationships The following is a visual derivation of the general inpedance and phase angle equations:
The last figure shows the phase relationship between the voltages across different circuit components and total voltage across the whole circuit. Observe that the current is in phase with the resistor.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Show Topics Menu Frames
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On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 01:23:58 GMT, Backyard Mechanic

The ignition system operates on a DC power supply - yes. But the ACTUAL behaviour of the ignition system most definitely entails an alternating current component. It is due to this "ac" component that it exhibits "impedence" Impedence requires bi-directional flow - and any way you slice it, the current IS alternating. Whether it actually changes polarity is strictly a case of semantics. Who defines what is Zero, to determine if the voltage crosses zero (the definition of alternating current)
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 21:34:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

alternating lmfao no alternating current in a battery unless you hook up a crappy tire a/c converter lmfao u been educated
hurc ast
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Ah, but there is AC at the pickup which is amplified by the module. Apparently you've never "played" with a duraspark system. I have, it gave me a much better idea of whats going on with ignition systems.
I suggest you stick to computer controlled vehicles that tell you whats wrong with them. You'd never make it as a mechanic, parts swapper.
I guess you think car audio systems are pure DC too.
I'll use your words: "u been educated", bitch.
JS
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The AC voltage from the pick up is merely a trigger signal, it has nothing to do with the spark voltage per-se.
The spark voltage is still primary voltage stepped up by the ignition coil.
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2005 00:06:44 GMT, aarcuda69062

neil why are u dwelling in this old post bored ?
hurc ast
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snipped-for-privacy@usenet.com wrote:

Yeah, bored and there's a blizzard hitting right now.
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We could call it an AC circuit "characteristic".. but not really a component. Lines of magnetic force moving across a conductor induce a current flow. This is part of our ignition coil and how many other circuits in a DC system..... the key being that the magnetic lines of force are moving...
Let's take a look at a simple relay coil..... When we "make" the circuit, current begins to flow through the windings.... as soon as the current starts to flow, magnetic lines of force start to move across the coil of wire. This induces current flow into the coil in the opposite direction as the applied force. Through a visious circle type scenario.... the coil is relatively slow to build to saturation since the reactance... the more current that flows, the more the magnetic field grows, the more it induces reactance..... in electronic terms (measured in nanoseconds in some cases and milliseconds in others), it stretches the event out incredibly. Inductive reactance.... impedance without resistance - hardly something exclusive to AC circuits.
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