Ford Focus 1.8 zetec y reg

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ive had my ford focus for six weeks now the problem is the battery light keeps coming on, it first came on after 3 days took it back to the garage where i bought it they charged the battery up checked the
alternator and said they could not find any fault, picked it up and after 30 minutes the light came on again, took it back the garage but this time they changed a wire to the alternator and a fuse, got the car back had it for two weeks thought everything was ok and the light came on again, ive checked online myself to try and solve the problem and everything points to the alternator but the garage is adamant its not faulty and have no idea what to do next.
the garage will change the car but they dont have another focus so i was wondering
1) change the alternator anyway 2) would fords be able to find the fault if i took it to them 3) any ideas as to what it could be. 4) get rid
p.s not sure if this should happen but when i start the car if the heater is set to 0 should the air recirc light be on.
if you need more info ill do my best to provide it.
thanks in advance for any help
Jon.
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just to let you know once the lights on if i continue to use the car the battery runs flat.
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Re: Ford Focus 1.8 zetec y reg:

That means that the battery is not being charged as it should, and the battery warning light should indeed come on. It sounds like a faulty alternator and/or the regulator.
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Vic Dura wrote:

Just for reference, the Focus doesn't have a charging regulator as such. Charge control is done within the ECU.
Chris
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the car was bought from a independent garage not a ford dealer.
ive spoken to them again today and once again they are adamant its not the alternator but a fault elsewhere, the owner is away till next wednesday so im stuck with the car till then, if the problem is the ecu would it be worth me taking it to fords and have them run an engine diagnostic, can the ecu be repaired or would it need to be replaced
is there anything else i could check myself.
once again many thanks for your replies
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wrote:

I would suggest to the Independant garage that they firstly recheck the 3 thin wires at the alternator where they emerge from the loom- they often break internally, and then if that seems ok, have them have a Ford dealer put it on the diagnostic machine and see what output the ECU is instructing from the alternator.
This will pin point where the problem lies.
Otherwise, reject the car.
Tim..
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cheers Tim for the advice, the 3 wires you mentioned have been replaced.
when i was taking the car back to the independent dealer today the battery light went out then came back on again 3 times, in the past once it came on it usually stayed on so with this happening im even more convinced that it probably is a problem with the wiring or the ecu, its booked into fords tomorrow for a diagnostic, the guy i spoke to said that even if the light isnt on whilst they have it the computer on the car will have logged an error code, ill post again once i have the results and with a bit of luck which i could do with right now the problem will be identified or even fixed
thanks once again to all those who have taken the time to reply, its very frustrating when you have problems like this.
Jon
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hi everyone had the diagnostic today and it turns out the pcm is knackered, when they say pcm do they mean the ecu, they quoted me 650 to replace it, 520 for the pcm and 105 labour so its going back to the garage tomorrow
they never mentioned if it could be repaired so out of curiosity can they be, also can a pcm from another focus be fitted
im gutted really because it a lovely car and its crazy to think what seems like a small fault could cost so much to fix.
thanks everyone once again.
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JonDoe wrote:

automotive newsgroups I'm now beginning to think that I should have bought a Toyota or a Honda.
<http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6319595.stm
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Ivan wrote:

Have you looked at parts prices for Japanese cars?
Chris
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Chris Whelan wrote:

Yes, but when taking into account what one reads about overall reliability.. and hears from owners at first hand (the proof being reflected in worldwide sales figures) then maybe the established European and US manufacturers should be taking a long hard look at themselves before it's too late.
IMO the reason Ford sales (in Europe at least) have been so good, is because probably they've been the best of a bad bunch.

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I'm afraid I can't comment on the situation in the US.
In 2002, Germany's TUV standards body carried out an extensive survey of the reliability of cars. This covered a large range of makes and models. The Focus came top for the least number of problems over a three year period.
BMW, Toyota and Ford were the makes that had the least number of breakdowns in 2001 according to the German ADAC rescue service.
A British warranty service provider lists Ford as having the 4th lowest repair costs in 2004.
Another thing to consider is that because of the high cost of repairs of all types, many more older Japanese cars are scrapped earlier in their life. The statistics then make them seem more reliable on the basis that there are not so many older Japanese cars on the road.
The idea that Ford are the best of a bad bunch might have been true in the 1980's; it's not so now!
Chris
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Chris Whelan wrote:

Problem is though Chris, when you do get problems whith a modern vehicle its now very unlikely to be fixed for 30 quid by your friendly neighbourhood or garage the AA man.
I'm still a bit miffed about the fact that I had to get rid of my 17 year old diesel Astra, with almost 200,000 trouble-free miles on the clock (simply because 'er indoors wanted something younger) unfortunately no manufacturer over the last few years has produced what I would call a good straightforward basic diesel car, by which I mean one that doesn't cost a hundred quid for a replacement ignition key and where the nearest thing thing it gets to an ECU is the solenoid in the fuel line!

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I was really only commenting on your statement that Ford have questionable reliability when compared to Japanese cars; this is demonstrably untrue.
Faults with modern cars often tend to be sensor failures. These can usually be diagnosed by the AA patrol; they all have laptops with full diagnostic software. The replacement sensor might be a bit more than 30 quid of course...
You have to accept that the reason things have changed has far more to do with meeting government imposed pollution targets than by any change the manufacturers would have made. Whether you think they are needed or not, (and this is not the place to discuss that), we have to arrange our motoring around them.
Oh, and in well over 40 years of motoring all the neighbourhood garages I have tried have been distinctly unfriendly!

Of course, a straightforward basic diesel that doesn't cause pollution can't be made.
FWIW, I would rather take the risk of having to pay 100UKP for a replacement key if it means that my car was much less likely to be stolen. My excess is more than that!
WRT your old Astra, your problem seems to be more marital than motoring :-)
Chris
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Chris Whelan wrote:

the handbook for my four and-a-half year-old -old Ford focus strongly advises against any more than a mixture of 5% bio - a huge ecological improvement then. :o)

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Ivan wrote:

The big problem with diesel pollution is particulate emission though, isn't it?
AFAIK, biodiesel does not help.
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Chris Whelan wrote:

I thought it was supposed to be carbon neutral?

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Ivan wrote:

http://www.biodieselfillingstations.co.uk / "The Main Environmental Advantage is that Biodiesel is carbon neutral, so using 100% Biodiesel in your vehicle means you are not adding to the global warming crisis. Biodiesel does not add any carbon because it utilises the amount of carbon which naturally circulates between the atmosphere and the biosphere (photosynthesis). Conventional fossil diesel however, does add to the overall level of carbon by extracting carbon deposited in the geosphere (mineral deposits) and releasing it into the atmosphere. Unlike any other available and easily accessible fuel at this time Biodiesel also has the potential of being 100% carbon neutral in its lifecycle too."

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Ivan wrote:

I think you are missing the point here. Note in my original post the term "particulate emission."
Diesels produce two exhaust related problems. One is the emission of so-called greenhouse gasses. These contribute to global warming. Bio-diesel is said to be carbon neutral; there is apparently some disagreement about this but it is a widely held view.
The second problem with diesels is that they emit particulate matter. These small particles have nothing to do with global warming, or the generation of greenhouse gasses. They have been proven beyond any reasonable doubt to cause harm to humans, contributing to illnesses such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. Some scientific bodies believe the emitted particles are dangerously carcogenic.
There is no evidence I can find that suggests bio-diesel reduces these particulate emissions.
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Ivan wrote:

It is. What has that got to do with particulates?
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