Ford Focus 1.8 zetec y reg

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Chris Whelan wrote:


Which can be taken care of <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_particulate_filter and anyway giventhe choice of particulates versus CO2 emissions, the Government's number one objective is always the elimination of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere to help prevent global warming, when did you last hear them mention particulates?
So there you have it Chris, it looks the ideal solution is a good simple, indestructible diesel-engine, fitted with a particulate filter and burning bio-diesel :o)

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Ivan wrote:

Did you read the Wikipedia article your link points to? In particular, section 5 which describes how a DPF regenerates?
If so, perhaps you would care to explain how a "good, simple" diesel engine (presumably one without an ECU), would handle this?
Of course, a disposable filter could be retro-fitted to an old engine; ITYWF the costs of this would soon persuade you to buy something newer!
Where is your source for the statement that "the Government's number one objective is always the elimination of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere"? Or is this just supposition? There is already Europe-wide legislation in place limiting particulate matter:
http://www.acidrain.org/pages/policy/sub6_9.asp
Chris
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Chris Whelan wrote:

Also in the same article Citroen and Peugeot have been using particulate filters as standard fit on their vehicles since 2000, so they are obviously a practical proposition, and talking of the extra expense, I seem to recall quite a few moans and groans on that account when catalytic converters were first made mandatory!

realise that hardly a day goes by without some government minister, expert or even Tony himself rattling on about CO2 emissions being a number one priority, by the same token when did you ever hear any of them ever mention particulates?

However you are detracting from my original point, which was that a 17 yearold diesel engine will run quite happily on 100 % biodiesel, and yet a new vehicle is only capable of running with a five per cent mixture.. which with the very serious concerns there are about global-warming I happen to think is really quite scandalous.
Presumably your argument is that this is a worthwhile trade-off in engine design, because modern engines don't emit as many particulates, which let's face it 'ever- increasing numbers' of fit and healthy people in their eighties and nineties in this country have been inhaling for decade's without apparent harm!.. where as a general and growing consensus of expert world opinion appears to indicate that by far the biggest threat of all of us is global warming.

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Ivan wrote:

Have they been using *disposable* filters then? No, I didn't think so... Perhaps it would be helpful if you read *all* the words in my posts before replying?

You haven't quoted your source of information that "the Government's number one objective is always the elimination of CO2 emissions", as opposed to your statement below that CO2 emissions are *a* number one objective.

I possess several TV's and radios. I also read quality daily newspapers.
The health problems caused by the emission of particulates from diesel engines is frequently discussed, often by Ken Livingstone. Perhaps it is you that needs to modify the type of programme you watch if you wish to become better informed.

But how many people running older diesels *do* use bio fuels? Because of its limited availability, how many actually could if they wanted to?
Disregarding the bio diesel issue on the basis that only a very small percentage of vehicles are actually using it, the newer car will contribute to global warning *much* less than a 17 year old one!

Again, you seem ill-informed. Do some research on the alarming increase in the number of cases of people suffering from lung disease and asthma in city areas. Yes, global warming is a threat that needs, and is being, addressed. It doesn't directly bear on the health of people in the same way that particulate emission does however.
Many of those "fit and healthy people in their eighties and nineties" were also cigarette smokers at some point in their lives. Your argument implies that smoking is not harmful. Do you believe that to be true?
Chris
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That is *not* how statistics are calculated, statisticians are of course aware that there are less of one product on the road than another, which is why statistics that are calculated correctly aren't biased.
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David R wrote:

My use of "statistics" was not intended to imply anything so formal.
There is a common perception of Japanese car reliability that is unfounded for a number of reasons. One of those reasons is that older Japanese cars get scrapped for relatively trivial reasons; they are uneconomic to repair at a much earlier age than others. This applies both to breakdown and accident repair. The information is on the 'net if you care to look.
Some German car brands have sunk like a stone in the reliability charts in recent years, but that's for totally different reasons.
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Welcome to the world of modern motoring, from what I read on various

They fail less regularly, and are usually much higher quality. The Japanese don't like crap manufacturing institutions, which is why sensible people buy Japanese.
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David R wrote:

Evidence?
The Japanese just like to make a profit, same as anyone else.
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Reliability surveys, owners own experiences, and so on. With any car, you could argue the owners expectations really decide they're expectations and wants of their car, so in reality there's no 100% accurate way of measuring the data.
But I'm sure we're still agreed that the majority of French cars are shit ;)
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wrote:

hi everyone had the diagnostic today and it turns out the pcm is knackered, when they say pcm do they mean the ecu, they quoted me 650 to replace it, 520 for the pcm and 105 labour so its going back to the garage tomorrow
they never mentioned if it could be repaired so out of curiosity can they be, also can a pcm from another focus be fitted
im gutted really because it a lovely car and its crazy to think what seems like a small fault could cost so much to fix.
ECU = PCM in Ford speak (they like to call it the Powertrain Control Module)
This will be the first PCM failure on a Focus that I have ever experienced, infact pretty rare on a Ford anyhow!
Yes, another PCM from a similar year 1.8 would work (must have the same breed of CDL controller as yours-there are two, and with/without a/c as per your car) Once fitted it would need training to the keys you have (2 must be present) and then flashed with the latest software version. Both these operations require a Ford dealer.
650 is not silly money at all for an ECU, if it were Jap, you can double that!
A new PCM will also carry a 12month warranty, so if there are problems after Mr Ford would have to sort it out.
Tim..
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You could try asking on uk.rec.cars.maintenance a number of mechanics over there may give you additional ideas.
No idea as to cost but .... http://www.the-ecu-doctor.co.uk /
hi everyone had the diagnostic today and it turns out the pcm is knackered, when they say pcm do they mean the ecu, they quoted me 650 to replace it, 520 for the pcm and 105 labour so its going back to the garage tomorrow
they never mentioned if it could be repaired so out of curiosity can they be, also can a pcm from another focus be fitted
im gutted really because it a lovely car and its crazy to think what seems like a small fault could cost so much to fix.
thanks everyone once again.
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They are pretty good value IIRC - my mate was very pleased with the service he got from them.
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JonDoe wrote:

If the fault was fixed for two weeks, it is more likely to be a wiring issue than an alternator fault.
Was it an independent garage you got it from, rather than a Ford dealer? If so, ask the supplying garage if they will send it to a dealer for investigation. That may well work out cheaper for them than the cost of you keep taking it back.

Yes. It's a feature, and one that I personally dislike!

Chris
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