1992 Police Caprice, shock/spring replacement suggestions

Hello, I recently purchased myself a 1992 Caprice with police options. It seems a little tired, 200k miles, and I'm told it was an actual police car. Seems to run good though, the problem is that it rides like
mush. Like the way my grandmother would like it to ride.
When I rev the engine the car bounces side to side for a while (one rev), I also have a 1988 Police Caprice that has awesome suspension, very tight, but then that was used as just a town car, not for pursuits, even though it does have 150k miles itself.
So, I need new shocks, maybe springs if people think so, so I'm curious what suggestions people have?
My first question is that I'm told the frame is the same between 1988 and 1992, even though the body changed, did the suspension at all change? I mean even if my springs and shocks on my 1988 are worn out, it's cheaper to use them and they may be good. So, did suspension/brakes/wheel hubs change between 1992 and 1988? I know the 1992 has AntiLock, and I thought that implied full discs (my 1988 has rear drums), but it may have rear drums still.
Most springs don't wear out that often, but if this is just shocks they must be very bad indeed, or were crap to begin with (which I can't imagine pursuing people like this). So, do people think I need just shocks or both?
Also, I've heard of shocks with a small spring around them to help the spring and raise the car a bit, any one have anything to say on these? Or if not, what would people suggest, maybe just napa or monroe shocks will be good (assuming the springs weren't soft and stupid to begin with, etc).
So, basically, anyone have anything to say on my situation, my '88 needs to be retired, but I want one to ride and drive like it.
Thanks, Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go for motor mounts too, while your at it.
ItJstAGame wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Check a parts store, see if the shocks for the 88 & 92 are the same part #, if so, swap them from one to the other. If the thing bounces as you say, they are definitly beat. Springs DO wear out, just because you don't see people ever changing them doesn't mean that they last a lifetime. The rears are an easy swap, the fronts a different story. Worn out springs are the leading cause of premature shock failure. If it were mine & I was going to the trouble, I'd go with new ones. Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Who's been feeding you THAT fairy tale???
The algebraic formula for determining spring steel rate does not differentiate between used and new spring steel. The modulus for new or used spring steel remains the same in the formula.
The only thing that happens to springs is that they lose their free height and ride height. Spring steel does not lose its spring rate.
Straighten a paper clip out, and hold one end down on the edge of the counter.
You can move the other end, and have it return to its original position.
Move it a bit too far, however, and it doesn't return to the original position. That doesn't mean that it doesn't still contain the same spring rate. It only means that you have exceeded the elastic limits of the steel in the paper clip.
That is what happens to automotive coil springs over time. They get pushed beyond their elastic limit, and take a new set....but the spring rate remains the same.
I have rated the same springs over and over for customers each racing season for years, and I have yet to see one that changes rate when compared to its previous rating on MY spring rater. They often change free height and ride height, but not actual spring rate.
The biggest contributor to the myth that spring steel wears out is the racer who rates his springs a year after buying them, and they do not match the published OEM spec.
Had he rated them brand new, straight from the box on his own spring rater, he would have found that they rated differently from OEM spec on his spring rater to start with due to differences between his spring rater and the factory spring rater.
Spring steel DOES NOT "wear out!"
--
Bob Paulin - R.A.C.E.
Race Car Chassis Analysis & Setup Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@alum.rpi.edu (ItJstAGame) wrote in message

dangerous to do and more expensive. If the car bounces around it's the shocks, check the struts up front while you're at it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you've seen a 1992 Chevrolet Caprice with struts - not shocks - on the front (or rear for that matter) BUY IT!!!
That would be one, rare bird since Chevrolet never put struts on ANY OTHER Caprice.
--
Bob Paulin - R.A.C.E.
Race Car Chassis Analysis & Setup Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go put 4 new springs on the vehicle of your choice (without changing the shocks) & if you can't feel it in the seat of your pants, you don't have a seat in your pants. Add 4 new shocks & if you still don't feel any difference, well no comment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.