1999 GMC suburban Starting problem

I've got some sort of electrical problem. My car won't start. I first thought it was a starter, so i replace the starter. It only worked for a few days. I had a mechanic look at it and he told us that we just
need to keep a 5/16 wrench in the truck because the dual battery cables just have a tendency to come loose. I tightened them when it wouldn't start. Sometimes I would also have to turn the cables a bit. In the meantime my problem seemed to get worse. I thought it was due to moving my battery cables back and forth. I thought when I moved the cables the teeth on the battery cables that are meant to ensure a good contact were just damaging the connecting terminal. I bought a multimeter to test this theory. It seemed plausible. But before I could get them replaced my car completely died. (It won't start no matter what you do). I replaced the cable terminals again using a multimeter to check the connections. NOTHING. Nothing happens when I try to jump start it either. I tried testing the resistance, and voltage in all of my battery cables. They appear good to a novice mechanic. But I still only get a click when I turn the ignition. Any advice or information would be great.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sometimes the internal connections on GMC battery cables get really badly corroded and you will have problems. You can remove the insulator and clean them, but you may have to eventually replace them if this is a problem.
Have your battery tested while you are at it. Sometimes batteries fail internally, and you may have to replace it.
Dont just replace and hope you hit the right part. Test the system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ohio Chem wrote:

Make sure the connection at the other end of the cable is good too. Your multimeter won't tell you directly whether you have a good connection. You could have a connection that seems good to the meter and powers the radio, but won't carry the amps for starting. What is the voltage reading when you hit the starter? It should drop a little, but not a lot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A friend of mine suggested that I test the ignition switch in the collumn. He said just because I had voltage doesn't mean I have current olms law. Current = voltage/resistance. I bypassed the switch and my car started just fine. So I think that I just had problems with the ignition switch. while replacing the switch I accidantally broke the plastic pin that turns the ignition switch. Now I'm going to have to take apart the stearing column to get to the piece I broke.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you are using side post batteries:
Obtain four each: 1"x3/8" coarse thread bolt and nut. Cut the rubber insulators off the battery side cables to expose the flat copper connectors. Thoroughly wire brush both sides of the flat copper connector. Thread a nut all the way onto the bolt. Insert bolt with nut through flat copper connector. Screw bolt with nut and connector onto battery side terminal until finger tight. Use one wrench to hold the bolt head still. Use another wrench to turn the nut so that it clamps the connector to the battery terminal. Spray with (red) battery terminal spray.
If you want to use a split washer between the nut and flat copper connector, you will have to use a 1-1/4"x3/8" bolt.
Repeat for the other terminal(s). Start with both positive terminals. Connect the negative terminals last. Them cables ain't going to come loose.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.