3.4L V6, where is this vacuum line suppose to go?

Car: 1999 chevy venture 3.4L engine
Can someone please tell me where this vacuum line goes? I was in a rush to replace the battery with a new one and somehow this vacuum
line shaken torn lose from where it was suppose to be hooked up to. It appears to be sucking air when I place a finger on it. The car still runs ok without it hooked up to where it is suppose to, though the engine light is on.
This line runs to somewhere undernaeth the windshield washer reservoir next to the battery.
https://docs.google.com/leaf?id 8xq8AVM1zd_N2MyMTI5YTctODViOS00ZWE0LWIxYWMtNDY3NDBmZmMzZTZl&hl=en
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throne7 wrote:

https://docs.google.com/leaf?id 8xq8AVM1zd_N2MyMTI5YTctODViOS00ZWE0LWIxYWMtNDY3NDBmZmMzZTZl&hl=en Looks like the one that goes to the vacuum canister in the fender.
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Steve W.
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That could be it. The battery in this car is located on the right hand side right next to the fender. I might have dislocated this vacuum connector in a rush to get the new battery in. I guess I will have to yank the battery out again.
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By the way, any idea what the vacuum canister is for ?
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throne7 wrote:

It's a storage tank basically. Holds vacuum for heater and engine controls and acts as a buffer for those times the engine changes rapidly and drops the vacuum level. On many vehicles the lack of the canister shows up in the HVAC system first.
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Well I am going to have to pull it apart again and see where it goes. Should have been real careful the first time.
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Also often referred to as 'Vacuum Reservoirs', and together with a check valve, insure a more/less constant vacuum source to some sensitive components.
Intake manifold vacuum dramatically bounces up and down as the throttle is open and closed in normal operation... and will rise to atmospheric pressure for periods when the throttle is wide open. Old timers will recall the early 'vacuum motor' powered windshield wipers slowing/stopping while accelerating or climbing hills.
Those big donut shaped brake boosters most all cars now use, have a secondary function to act as such a reservoir dedicated to the brake system... allowing a limited number of power assisted brake applications should it's vacuum source be lost. (Pumping the brakes in such a situation will quickly deplete stored vacuum, greatly increasing the drivers required petal force to slow/stop the vehicle. You can get a good idea of what yours will feel like by (parked in a safe place with the parking brake on) pumping the brakes without the engine running. They'll feel absolutely sickening after maybe 3 to six pumps... restarting the engine will return things to normal.)
Many vehicles employ reservoirs, most are now plastic, but metal 'food can' looking ones can be found... they're frequently tucked out of the way in misc body cavities.
Get that line reconnected before running the engine anymore. You have a rather serious vacuum leak as is, that could lead to burned a valve/s if left uncorrected.
Erik
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