3800 variants?

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@hotmail.com says...


That sounds better :P 50,000+ lbs of drag? That would be pushing it backwards lol :D
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Haha, yea...I was doing them and was thinking "those sound way too high"
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Nope, speed SQUARED.

Cd is for the metric system, so a lot of unit conversion is necessary:
Cd * 72.6 * 0.0254 * 49.1 * 0.0254 * (60 * 1609 / 3600) ^ 2
Thus, for a Cd of 0.28, the drag force is 463N or 104lbs. and for a Cd of 0.30, 496N or 111lbs.
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much
It's gotta be higher then that. In physics class we got the Cd of a model rocket, did all the measuring and math and came up with I believe 24 lbs at some speed...maybe 50 or 60 mph and the teacher checked off on it. I do seem to remember squaring V now that you mention it but we did all the measurements in the imperial system.
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Drag force= (1/2)Crav^2
For speed 1 mph is 1.609344 kph and 60*1.609344–.56064 and 96.56064^2“23.957197
Since we don't have the density of air it's (1/2)(.28)(2.299776046)(9323.957197)002.021878 N = 674.881366 pounds force and for the Cd of .30 it's 3 216.452012 Newtons = 723.087177 pounds force.
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This is Km/h, but we need m/s.
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I do believe that you're right. We're gonna get to the bottom of this damned thing soon :P
96.56064 km/h is 26.8224 m/s and keeping all that the same .28 is 231.6374906 N and that's 52.0741794 pounds force. .30 is 248.1830256 N and that's 55.7937637 pounds force.
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Actually, the biggest factor is friction: between the tires and the road, in the tires walls, in the transmission.
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Yea, I'll agree with that one. I have a program that'll give you the 0-60, top speed, gas mileage...etc etc if you put in all the specs and powertrain losses are the highest, followed by the tires and stuff then drag.
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Have fun "upgrading" to 134a. Once we've retrofitted barrier hoses, replaced all the O-rings and the orifice, replaced the cycling switch, replaced the accumulator, flushed out the mineral oil and replaced it with esther, we've sunk a ton a cash into a project that yields somewhat less effective cooling. Then figure the higher head pressures on the compressor, the evaporator that's been quietly corroding away for a decade, and the condensor that's been battered with stones, bugs and the occasional small mammal for the same period of time, and it turns into a massive money pit that lasts for 18 months before crapping out again. Sorry, I'm still bitter about the outcome of *that* brilliant idea. Marky
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And if it wasn't enough, some scientists published papers on evidence that the ozone hole over the poles have been there for at least 1 century, well before CFC was invented.
The fact is that any volcano eruption releases more chlorine in the atmosphere than mankind has ever or will ever.
But environmentalists never allow facts get in their way to absolute power. Just think that the Hummer dealer they arsoned in CA released more pollution than all the almost 100 vehicles destroyed would in all their expected life.
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snipped-for-privacy@mailandnews.com (Neo) wrote in

I think there is some question as to the accuracy of all data we see in reports and surveys today, and the earth probably does go through long warming and cooling periods, but we definitely need to look at the effects of our actions on the environment and err on the side of safety. Likewise, environmental extremists only interfere in reaching agreements to do this.
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I'll give you the links.
http://lists.isb.sdnpk.org/pipermail/eco-list/2002-January/002162.html http://www.anxietycenter.com/warning/v4n9.htm (it's there...you just have to scroll down a little bit) http://facstaff.uww.edu/rambadtd/EuroGeog/Nielsen/paper.htm and lastly one that says that while it may be happening parts of the world will cool off http://in.news.yahoo.com/040122/137/2b2ci.html
Those are the closest that I found to what I read. I personally don't think that there is anything to worry about.
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Phillip Schmid wrote in alt.autos.gm

As I said, and most of your links confirm it. It is the neo-conversatives that are attempting to deny it. Note the last article does not deny global warming. Scientists are just now starting to understand the effects. Some areas may experience colder weather, as the oceans change levels, and as more moisture is in the air. The increased moisture can and will change the dynamics of the weather. And higher sea levels also mean that areas that are just above sea level will in a few decades become lower than sea level. I also read where global warming will cause the crop growing areas to move further away from the equator by a few hundred miles.
--
Dick #1349
Damn it . . . Don't you dare ask God to help me.
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We haven't recovered from the mini ice age in the middle ages. Temperatures are still cooler than 1000 years ago and even cooler than 2000 years ago. The Vikings had farms in Greenland, for Pete's sake!
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I think that the ozone hole thing is nonsense too, but I think while people may have had a very small role in making them that Earth'll fix them up. Who's to say that there weren't ozone holes before people were around?
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Phillip Schmid wrote in alt.autos.gm

Maybe there were, when there was more volcanic activity. The problem is not whether there were or not, but how much our pollutants contribute to the problem.
--
Dick #1349
Damn it . . . Don't you dare ask God to help me.
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I agree. I'm kind of curious what's really stopping us from making O3 and "patching" up the ozone layer.
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I have 3.8L series 1 engine, it has about 160,000 Km. Never been opened. I have replaced water pump and one ignition coil. No other problem. Still has original exhaust (cat) and running fine. No intake gasket problem either because it is all aluminum intake and engine has no EGR valve. Plastic intake manifold was introduced in 1995 for series II. engine. EGR valve re-introduced in 1993. There has been a few changes with the 4T60 transmission as well around transmission control and final drive for durability to handle more engine torque. The only problem it is 1992 and it does not have traction control and air-bags so it will have to go soon. I also have 3.8L series 1 supercharged engine. It has over 300,000 Km. This vehicle I will keep primarily no one will buy the vehicle that has a lot of mileage at a fair price and since it still run like a rocket and has all options I need, there is no point for me to change vehicle. Only problem is it needs high octane gas! cheers

live.
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<Snip>

I must be REALLY lucky then. I have had 3 vehicles with 3800s (pre 1990 series I), including the car I'm driving now. 2 Buick Park Aves, and a LeSabre, all of them had tranny problems @ around 100-120k Miles, but the engine in the LeSabre was good till 200K Miles when the car was stolen (this was about 3 years ago), the first park ave had 170K Miles without a teardown or major engine work, just had a rusted body, and the Park Ave I have now has 165K Miles and the worst I've had to do in the past 50,000 is a O2 sensor.
IMHO, the 3800 is *the* best engine ever produced by GM. Series I or II (My wife's car has a series II), they are super-reliable, powerful, and well designed.
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