90 Beretta Fuel Injectors

Hi there...I have a 90 chevy beretta v6 3.1 that I purchased from a friend that recently started dying after it ran for awhile. It would restart, but then immediately afterwards die. I took it into a repair
shop to see what they could find out, as I don't have computers to check all that fun stuff. On a side note, I replaced the fuel pump and filter (for fun it appears). The shop claims that my fuel injectors aren't firing properly, and that I need to replace at least two of them, and possibly all 6, quoting me some ridiculous $700 figure. I am pretty confident in my ability to fix things that I can locate, but I have never worked with fuel injectors before. I am basically asking if it is even worth fixing the fuel injectors, and whether this diagnosis is correct. Also, if peeps could give me some advice on the actual process of replacing them, I would love that too... like I said, I know my way around a car enough to keep it out of the shop for everything but the really major repairs, so I would like to figure out how to do this on my own and avoid those huge shop fees (college student sucks huh?). Any help would be appreciated, thanks peeps.
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Remanufactured injectors can be gotten here:
http://www.lindertech.com /
On an 18 year old car it probably doesn't pay to buy new injectors.
Replacing the injectors isn't hard, you'd be best served to consult a good service manual. basically, you need to; bleed off the fuel pressure, remove the upper intake manifold, disconnect the fuel lines, unbolt the fuel rail, remove the fuel rail with injectors from the lower intake manifold, disengage the injectors from the fuel rail, flush the fuel rail with a clean solvent, blow it dry, install the replacement injectors, reinstall the rest in reverse order...
Are they bad? Probably. The injectors used by GM during that era are notoriously failure prone. depending on your skill level and equipment, there are a few tests that can be performed to verify whether the injectors are failed. The most common failure is shorted windings in the injectors, the shorted winding causes excessive current flow thru a component in the engine computer called a driver, the engine computer will shut down in an effort to protect itself from the over current.
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Yeah I almost always buy remanufactured, but maybe that comes from owning sub 1k cars :P

I have a chilton's manual that shows me most of it, but that doesn't necessarily explain everything. Hopefully I can take this info and use it to expand on my net searches to get some more details. Thanks a ton.

shocking, GM produce cheaply made parts during the 90's? Never :) I just replaced an intake manifold on my Buick, and helped a friend with her head gasket on her Monte Carlo...all from my favorite engine type of all time, the 3100 series!

Thats basically what they said, that it was getting too much fuel which caused the computer to register it as overheating and then it would shut down. Basically this car is going to be a gift to a friend to help him get back on his feet, but at 700 dollars who knows. If we can work our way through this, hopefully we can get this going for him. Thanks again for the help, and I appreciate any more help that can be given.
DMan
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theory which may be helpful.HTH http://www.autoshop101.com/techarticles/technicalarticles.html#Electrical
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