92 Bonnevile water in the engine

The other day I was crossing a flooded street and water got into the engine. I removed the spark plugs, cranked the engine, reinstalled the spark
plugs and the car started. There was water in the crankcase also and I replaced the oil. I know that antifreezer in the crankcase ruins the berrings. Does only water has the same effect?
Antonio
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Alpha One wrote:

I don't think fresh water is as bad as antifreeze, but more knowledgeable folks will comment. The fact is you were smart enough to get the water out of the cylinders before attempting a restart and bending a rod. You got the water out of the crankcases too and any tiny risidual will quickly burn off with no ill effects. That must have been some really high water for you to have water in the crankcase as everything is fairly well sealed. And If it was that high, I would expect other problems with wiring, sensors, relays, etc.
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Change the oil and filter again, soon.

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A long 50 mile or so run will do more than changing the oil again. It needs to be brought up to temperature and run for a half hour or more to dry the whole engine out.

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Thank you.
The water wasn't that high. I think it was tuching the bottom of the car. Smaller car went by without stoping. I think it was a wave caused by other cars.

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Last summer I had the same thing happen to me in my '95 Beretta. Removed plugs, turned over (water shot a good 20 feet), changed oil/filter and air filter, which was soaked). Also did new plugs and plug wires while I was at it. Drove it around town for about an hour, changed oil/filter again. I haven't seen any ill effects from this and it was almost a year ago.

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As long as you didn't let it sit for an extended amount of time with the water in there you'll be fine. After the oil is changed, check the dipstick a few times to make sure you don't still have water in there. It will be kind of milky/foamy if you have water in it. Kind of a bad location for the air intake on the bonneville, if I remeber correctly the intake is at the same height as the bottom of the bumper.
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If the water was only up to the bottom of the car how did water get in the engine?
harryface 05 Park Avenue 37,659 91 Bonnevile LE 306,528
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Thank you Harry. I wondered why that thought died. A puddle that stalls the engine from the air inlet is not enough to get water in the crankcase. Water would need to be very high indeed and the dipstick or some other vent type area would need to be breached. The tiniest amount might pass through the ring gaps, but not enough to worry about after he drove it around.
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its the acidity of the antifreeze that harms the bearings...residual water will just settle to the bottom of the oil pan lots of run time and frequent oil changes are the best thing...it should all be ok...i'd be checking your trans.
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